snowbird

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snowbird

One who leaves their home to stay in a warmer climate during the winter months (as to avoid snow and other winter weather). Often said of retirees. Now that my parents are retired, they're total snowbirds—they leave New York after Christmas and spend the rest of the winter in Florida.
References in classic literature ?
Perhaps it was caused by either the originality or the audacity of the snow-bird hunter, in thus circumventing her express commands against the ordinary modes of communication.
To look at them, frolicking in the wintry garden, you would have thought that the dark and pitiless storm had been sent for no other purpose but to provide a new plaything for Violet and Peony; and that they themselves had beer created, as the snow-birds were, to take delight only in the tempest, and in the white mantle which it spread over the earth.
At this instant a flock of snow-birds came flitting through the air.
He soon perceived the little white stranger sporting to and fro in the garden, like a dancing snow-wreath, and the flock of snow-birds fluttering about her head.
He looked outside, and half a dozen snow-birds fluttered across his field of vision.
There’s plenty of pheasants among the swamps; and the snow-birds are flying round your own door, where you may feed them with crumbs, and shoot them at pleasure, any day; but if you’re for a buck, or a little bear's meat, Judge, you’ll have to take the long rifle, with a greased wadding, or you’ll waste more powder than you’ll fill stomachs, I’m thinking.”
Tiny white snow-birds appeared from the south, lingered a day, and resumed their journey into the north.
Snow-bird season will bring high profits, starting next month.
This company helps vacationing and snow-bird golfers eliminate the guess work of which golf courses are best suited for them.
Here snow-birds flit above them or perch on leafless branches of a nearby tree.
As snow-birds rest on her shoulders or flit above her, he looks upon the snow maiden, whose hair, catching up something of the gold in the wintry sunset, has a faint tint of gold, another of the touches revealing Waterman's close reading of the text.
Snow-birds no longer flit, and the day draws to an end, as suggested by the gray and purplish background.
His subject is the Snow Maiden, depicted in black and white as swirling winds and flitting snow-birds become part of his dynamic, kinetic representation of the graceful and delicate young girl created by the imaginative Violet and Peony, who are nowhere to be seen in Church's etching.
Snow-birds flit around her or peck in the snow behind her.