snow in


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snow in

1. To surround something with snow, rendering it impassable, immovable, or inoperable. Often used in passive constructions. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "snow" and "in." Traffic on the interstate was so bad that the snowstorm that blew through actually ended up snowing many of cars in, causing even more traffic problems as a result. I just got a call from the ski lodge. Apparently they were snowed in by the blizzard last night, and there's no way to get in or out of the place at the moment.
2. To cause someone or something to be unable to leave a building or area due to the snow. Often used in passive constructions. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "snow" and "in." We were snowed in for several days, with only a small cupboard's worth of food to subsist on.
See also: snow

snow someone or something in

[for heavy snowfall] to block someone or something in a place. The sudden storm snowed us in. The storm snowed in most of the people in town.
See also: snow

snowed in

trapped (somewhere) because of too much snow. The snow was so deep that we were snowed in for three days. Being snowed in is no problem if you have enough food.
See also: snow

snow in

v.
1. To cause something to be inoperable or unable to move safely due to snow. Used chiefly in the passive: The airport was snowed in, and no flights left that day. The school buses were snowed in, so classes were canceled.
2. To cause someone or something to remain inside due to snow: The blizzard had snowed in all the townspeople, and all the restaurants were closed. A sudden storm had snowed us in, and we were worried that we would run out of food.
3. To cause something to be surrounded by snow: The storm snowed in the mountain and confined the climbers to their tents. One winter, a blizzard snowed their cabin in, and they had to tunnel out the window.
See also: snow
References in periodicals archive ?
And there are some brilliant quirky clips too, including Durham University students descending on the city for its RAG antics in 1956, children scrambling about in the snow in 1940 and the Newcastle Aero Club completing a hilarious obstacle course in 1926.
Snow in the city becomes slush almost as soon as it has fallen, as this picture shows in 1968Well, they may have cold feet but at least this gaggle of geese can show off their legs, as pale sunshine fails to melt the water of Sefton Park lake, Liverpool, in 1956 The chap to the top right not suffering from chilblains is Prince Albert on his stone plinth and bronze horse at St George's plateau, LiverpoolAt a time of trouble, the good man shines.
Of course, there is snow in the high mountains, but there are palm trees in Jalalabad.