snoop

(redirected from snooping)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

snoop about (something or some place)

To investigate, search through, or inquire impertinently into something or some place. Please tell me that the cops won't find any incriminating evidence if they start snooping about your office. Sarah's been snooping about, lately—I think she's starting to suspect me.
See also: snoop

snoop around

To investigate, search through, or inquire impertinently into something or some place. Please tell me that the cops won't find any incriminating evidence if they start snooping around your office. Sarah's been snooping around, lately—I think she's starting to suspect me. I started snooping around the senator's campaign records and discovered a vast conspiracy of fraud and embezzlement.
See also: around, snoop

snoop into (something)

To investigate, pry, or inquire impertinently into something. Please tell me that the cops won't find any incriminating evidence if they start snooping into our financial practices! I started snooping into the senator's campaign records and discovered a vast conspiracy of fraud and embezzlement.
See also: snoop

snoop around (something)

to look around in a place, trying to find out something secret or about someone else's affairs. Why are you snooping around my house? I am not snooping around.
See also: around, snoop

snoop into something

to pry into something or someone else's affairs. I wish you would stop snooping into my business! Whose affairs are they snooping into now?
See also: snoop

snoop

1. in. to prowl around looking for something. What are you snooping around here for?
2. n. someone who prowls around looking for something. Fred is just a snoop. He went through my desk!
References in periodicals archive ?
Table 2 reveals the various ways the respondents identified that they engaged in snooping behavior.
The data in Table 2 reflect that the text messages the partner had sent was the primary target for snooping behavior.
two-thirds (65 %) reporting snooping through the partner's cell phone history.
Table 3 reveals the various times and percentages the respondents reported engaging in snooping behavior.
The data in Table 3 reflect that snooping occurred most frequently when the partner was taking a shower.
Logistic regression was performed for the dependent variable of whether or not respondents had ever snooped, with categories of "yes" and "no." Findings indicate that four of the independent variables were significant at the p < .05 level in predicting odds of snooping. Being female, being older, being a jealous person, and having a partner who cheated on the respondent were all associated with engaging in snooping behavior.
Findings revealed that four of the independent variables are significant at the p < .05 level in predicting the odds of snooping. Being female, being religious, identifying with Christianity (in contrast to no religion) and being jealous were associated with higher numbers of times the respondent reported engaging in snooping behavior.
"You only snoop on the one you love." The data revealed that persons in new relationships thought snooping was inappropriate.
"One should feel guilty for snooping." While snooping seems justified if there is reason to be suspicious, where there is no reason to doubt the partner, there is the feeling that snooping is not right and that the snooper should feel guilty.
"Confrontation sometimes occurs." Almost a third (31%) of the respondents reported that they confronted the partner with what they found snooping (21% said they discovered their partner had cheated).
"Outcome of snooping." Over a third (36%) said that they found what they were snooping for.
2010; Dawkins, 2010) and snooping behavior (Afifi and Burgoon.
In reference to snooping, individuals in a relationship value each other and are reinforcing to each other.
For example, if there is suspicion that one's partner is lying/cheating, snooping provides a means of discovery to remove the uncertainty.
In reference to the current study, snooping as a mechanism to reduce uncertainty seemed to work.