sneeze


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nothing to be sneezed at

Not something that should be ignored, dismissed, or treated with disdain; something that is not inconsequential. The amount of votes she managed to muster is nothing to be sneezed at. Sure, a hundred bucks isn't a huge amount to have won, but it's definitely nothing to be sneezed at!
See also: nothing, sneeze

nothing to sneeze at

Not something that should be ignored, dismissed, or treated with disdain; something that is not inconsequential. She never really had a chance of winning, but the amount of votes she managed to muster is truly nothing to sneeze at. Sure, a hundred bucks isn't a huge amount to have won, but it's definitely nothing to sneeze at!
See also: nothing, sneeze

when (something) sneezes, (something else) catches a cold

When a person, group, or entity has a problem or experiences a negative situation, a related person, group, or entity will consequently have a worse problem or will experience a more negative situation. When Paris sneezes, Europe catches a cold. Terrorism in France affects security throughout the continent.
See also: catch, cold

if (something) sneezes, (something else) catches a cold

If a person, group, or entity has a problem or experiences a negative situation, a related person, group, or entity will consequently have a worse problem or will experience a more negative situation. If Paris sneezes, Europe catches a cold. Terrorism in France affects security throughout the continent.
See also: catch, cold, if

nothing to sneeze at

 and nothing to be sneezed
See also: nothing, sneeze

sneeze at someone

to sneeze in someone's direction. Please don't sneeze at me! Cover your nose and mouth! You should never sneeze at anyone. It is very bad manners.
See also: sneeze

sneeze at something

Fig. to indicate one's disapproval of something; to belittle someone or something. I wouldn't sneeze at that amount of money if I were you. It's better than nothing. I though it was a good offer, but the customer just sneezed at it.
See also: sneeze

sneeze into something

to aim a sneeze into something. You should always sneeze into a handkerchief. Please sneeze into a tissue or something.
See also: sneeze

sneeze on someone or something

to aim a sneeze onto someone or something, probably by accident. Don't sneeze on me! Don't sneeze on anything. Cover your nose and mouth!
See also: on, sneeze

not to be sneezed at

Also, nothing to sneeze at. Not to be ignored or dismissed, as in It's a great honor, not to be sneezed at, or That salary of his is nothing to sneeze at. This expression presumably alludes to turning up one's nose in disdain. [c. 1800]
See also: not, sneeze

when the US/UK/China, etc. sneezes, Japan/Germany, etc. catches cold

or

when the US/UK/China, etc. sneezes, Japan/Germany, etc. catches a cold

mainly BRITISH
If you say that when a particular country sneezes, another catches cold, or catches a cold, you mean that what happens to the first country has a great effect or influence on the second. And when the American economy sneezes, the City of London catches cold. As they say, when America sneezes the rest of the world catches a cold.
See also: catch, cold, japan, UK

not to be sneezed at

or

not to be sniffed at

INFORMAL
If something is not to be sneezed at or not to be sniffed at, it is worth having. The money's not to be sneezed at. At least she had somewhere to live and a job — both temporary, but not to be sniffed at.
See also: not, sneeze

not to be sneezed at

not to be rejected without careful consideration; worth having or taking into account. informal
See also: not, sneeze

not to be ˈsneezed/ˈsniffed at

(informal) important or worth having: If I were you, I’d take the job. A salary like that’s not to be sneezed at.
See also: not, sneeze, sniff

when A ˈsneezes, B catches a ˈcold

(also if A catches a ˈcold, B gets pneuˈmonia less frequent) if one person, organization, country, etc. has a problem, the effects of this on another person, organization or country are much more serious: When Wall Street sneezes, the world catches a cold.
See also: catch, cold

sneeze at

v.
To treat something as unimportant. Used chiefly in the passive with a negative word: The critical nature of the job at hand is not to be sneezed at.
See also: sneeze

nothing to sneeze at

n. no small amount of money; something not inconsequential. It’s not a lot of money, but it’s nothing to sneeze at.
See also: nothing, sneeze
References in periodicals archive ?
According to CDC, droplets from cough and sneeze can travel short distances, less than 3 feet or 1 metre from one person to another.
A sneeze during a critical moment of a journey could have serious consequences.
The study conducted by MIT researchers have showed that when some coughs or sneezes, there is a gas cloud that is formed, which keeps the potentially infectious droplets aloft over much greater distances.
This makes a lot more sense; we excuse ourselves when burping, farting, coughing, and hiccupping even though, as anyone who's guzzled their root beer too quickly will tell you, a hiccup fit is more uncontrollable and much funnier than any sneeze could ever be.
And he was stunned when doctors told him his sneezes had dislodged a blood clot in his chest.
com, elbow sneezing is a significantly better way to sneeze than hand honking and a lot better manners than human germ factories who prefer to let their sneezes fly into the air around them, unimpeded and infecting anyone within three or four feet.
We should encourage everyone to minimise the spread by using handkerchiefs and tissues every time they cough or sneeze.
The sneeze impulse affects a variety of body parts, including the abdomen, chest, neck and face.
Cat lovers already fork over thousands for premium breeds, so taking out the sneeze factor, which afflicts some 30 million Americans, makes for an easy-to-sell product.
Says the trust's head of road safety policy Andrew Howard: "Drivers doing 70mph lose their vision for as much as 100 metres with every sneeze - someone having a sneezing fit of eight sneezes in a row could be travelling blind for up to half a mile.
Your Majesty must freeze your knees while you sneeze.
Dean's recent installation, Sneeze, 2000, continued in this vein but thwarted the viewer's control once it had been established.
Keep in mind that a sneeze contains up to 5,000 droplets of mucus-filled air that can travel up to twelve feet.
If they sneeze on their hands and then touch something that you also touch, you could end up sniffling and sneezing, too.
A violent sneeze scatters some 20,000 water droplets through the air.