sneaky

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sneaky Pete

slang Cheap, low-quality wine. Primarily heard in US. I can't drink sneaky Pete anymore, that stuff is disgusting! Is he drunk on sneaky Pete already?
See also: Pete, sneaky

sneaky

mod. unfair and sly. Jerry is sneaky. Don’t trust him.
References in periodicals archive ?
69) Analogy is closely related to metaphor and prototype, but the latter two may be easier to spot, making analogy sneakier and thus more insidious.
On a sneakier note, the survey showed a third of us use mobiles to conceal our true locations, more than quarter make up last minute excuses on their mobiles to avoid meetings and more than a fifth mislead a family member, partner or friend on the phone, lie to an employer or pretend they are working when they are not.
An even sneakier assault has been playing out in slow motion through the budget process.
100) Poston's community analyst came up with an even sneakier way of enticing young men in camp into going along with the draft.
These purse lifters are getting more experienced and sneakier.
Theatre is this poor little art form that doesn't get much attention--so we're allowed to tell stories that are sneakier than people think.
The pop-under is the sneakier relative of the pop-up ad.
But he manages to convey conflict in sneakier ways.
While those charges are pretty easy to spot and compare from fund to fund, the 12b-1 is a sneakier fee that might creep up on your mutual fund invest creep up on your mutual investment and catch you unawares.
In fact, the formal semantics of model theory is even sneakier than the above description.
The opponents of public education are getting nastier and sneakier.
If snails are a problem, control the ones you see by hand-picking; lay chemical bait for the sneakier ones.
Through consumer education and tools, such as McAfee([R]) SiteAdvisor([R]) site ratings, consumers are getting smarter about searching online, yet cybercriminals are getting sneakier in their techniques.
Today's clocks, however, are sneakier than that--inasmuch as they are less about something scheduled to occur in the near future than they are a means to keep people watching right now, as anchors endeavor to kill time while nothing much is happening.