sneak


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Related to sneak: sneak out
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jerry sneak

1. obsolete A man who has been thoroughly and continually dominated, intimidated, bullied, or browbeaten by his wife. Refers to a character in Samuel Foote's 1764 play The Mayor of Garratt. Lord Edgar used to be the most adventurous man I knew, but since getting married, he's become a real jerry sneak.
2. obsolete Someone who steals watches. I know that man—he's a jerry sneak who's stolen many a watch from my patrons!
See also: Jerry, sneak

sneak around

1. To move around (some place) in a quiet, sneaky, inconspicuous, or furtive manner. Why are you sneaking around the back yard like that? Are you trying to hide something? I hate sneaking around like this, but I don't want Sarah to know what I'm planning for her birthday.
2. To move past or attempt to move past someone or something in a sneaky, furtive manner so as not to be noticed. We need to get into that warehouse, but I don't know how we're going to sneak around those guards.
3. To bypass or attempt to bypass the control or authority of some person, group, or thing. The giant corporation has been accused of sneaking around local and international tax laws through the use of illegal shell companies in tax havens around the world. They've been sneaking around the approval of the board with their research.
See also: around, sneak

sneak away (from some place)

To leave, depart, or move away from some place in a quiet, sneaky, inconspicuous, or furtive manner. I snuck away from the party when things started getting so rowdy. I'll distract them so you have a chance to sneak away.
See also: away, sneak

sneak in

1. To enter (some place) in a quiet, sneaky, inconspicuous, or furtive manner, so as not to be detected. The burglar snuck in without making a sound. Marty got caught sneaking in to the house way past his curfew.
2. To transport someone or something in (to something or some place) in a surreptitious, deceitful, or stealthy manner, especially when it is illegal or forbidden to do so. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "sneak" and "in." My cousin tried to sneak me in to the club, even though I was only 18 years old. They were thrown out of the school dance for sneaking in bottles of alcohol.
3. To insert or include using sly, subtle, or surreptitious means something that is normally forbidden, unwanted, or frowned upon. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "sneak" and "in." The show's writers always try to sneak jokes in that would normally get rejected by the network censors. When I was writing my midterm paper, I managed to sneak in a quotation from a video game. I have to sneak vegetables in to my kids' meals, or else they simply won't eat them.
See also: sneak

sneak in(to some place)

To enter some place in a quiet, sneaky, inconspicuous, or furtive manner. The burglar snuck in without making a sound. Marty came sneaking into the classroom, late as usual.
See also: sneak

sneak out (of some place)

To exit some place in a quiet, sneaky, inconspicuous, or furtive manner. I managed to sneak out of the room without the teacher noticing me. I'll have to wait until my parents are asleep before I can sneak out can come meet you.
See also: out, sneak

sneak past (someone or something)

1. Literally, to attempt to move past someone or something without being seen or detected. The spy used a disguise to sneak past the guards.
2. To transport someone or something past some guard, inspector, checkpoint, etc., in a surreptitious, deceitful, or stealthy manner, especially when it is illegal or forbidden to do so. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "sneak" and "in." I tried sneaking a bunch of Chinese snacks past customs and immigration when I flew back into Sydney Airport, but they caught me and made me throw them all away. My cousins tried to sneak me past the bouncer, even though I was only 18.
3. To cause something that is normally forbidden, unwanted, or frowned upon to be accepted or go unnoticed by someone or something through sly, subtle, or surreptitious means. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "sneak" and "in." The writers of the popular kids' show were always trying to sneak adult content past the network censors. The senators have been accused of trying to sneak unrelated spending increases past the rest of congress by hiding them inside the recent healthcare legislation.
See also: past, sneak

sneak preview

A viewing or attendance of something before it is ready to be shown or released to the general public. Film journalists across the state were invited to a sneak preview of the new blockbuster in Hollywood. During the interview, I was given a sneak preview of the latest sculpture she's been working on.
See also: preview, sneak

sneak the sunrise past a rooster

To do something that is extremely difficult or nearly impossible. Primarily heard in US. Getting a shot past this talented goal keeper has been like sneaking the sunrise past a rooster for the opposing team.
See also: past, rooster, sneak

sneak up (on someone or something)

1. To approach someone or something in a sneaky, furtive manner so as not to be noticed. Don't sneak up on me like that—you frightened the life out of me! We don't want the guards to see us, so we'll need to sneak up from the back.
2. To come up on someone or some group gradually or without being noticed. I've been so busy with my work that our wedding anniversary completely snuck up on me. The deadline is sneaking up on us, and we still haven't made any substantial progress.
See also: sneak, someone, up

sneak up to (someone or something)

To creep up to or alongside someone or something in a secretive or inconspicuous manner so as not to be seen or noticed. I snuck up to the window to see what was going on inside the building. She snuck up to the man and slipped a note into his bag.
See also: sneak, up

sneaks

slang A shortening of "sneakers." My parents thought it was a little classless wearing sneaks on my wedding day, but I told them they were just too old-fashioned. Hey, watch the sneaks, man! I just bought them!
See also: sneak
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

sneak around (some place)

to move about a place in a sneaky or stealthy fashion. Please don't sneak around the house. It makes me nervous. Please stop sneaking around!
See also: around, sneak

sneak around someone or something

 
1. Lit. to creep around or past someone or something. The cat sneaked around Molly and ran out the door. We had to sneak around the corner so we wouldn't be seen.
2. Fig. to circumvent the control or censorship of someone or some group. I think we can sneak around the board of directors and authorize this project ourselves. Yes, let's sneak around the board.
See also: around, sneak

sneak away (from some place)

to go away from a place quietly and in secret. Jeff tried to sneak away from the party, but Judy saw him. They sneaked away together.
See also: away, sneak

sneak in(to some place)

to enter a place quietly and in secret, perhaps without a ticket or permission. The kids tried to sneak into the rock concert, but they were stopped by the guards. Never try to sneak in. Sometimes they arrest you for trespassing.
See also: sneak

sneak out (of some place)

to go out of a place quietly and in secret. I sneaked out of the meeting, hoping no one would notice. Jamie saw me and sneaked out with me.
See also: out, sneak

sneak up on someone or something

to approach someone or something quietly and in secret. Please don't sneak up on me like that. I sneaked up on the cake, hoping no one would see me. someone did.
See also: on, sneak, up

sneak up to someone or something

to move close to someone or something quietly and in secret. I sneaked up to Don and scared him to death. Don sneaked up to the punch bowl and helped himself before the party began.
See also: sneak, up
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

sneak preview

An advance showing of something, as in It was supposed to be bad luck but she gave the bridegroom a sneak preview of her wedding gown . This expression originated in the 1930s for a single public showing of a motion picture before its general release, and in succeeding decades was transferred to other undertakings.
See also: preview, sneak
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

a ˌsneak ˈpreview

an opportunity to look at or watch something, for example a book or a film/movie, before it is shown to the public: She gave me a sneak preview of her latest painting.
See also: preview, sneak
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

sneak around

v.
1. To move or operate in some place furtively or surreptitiously: The security guard caught the thief sneaking around the office after closing.
2. To do something without someone's knowledge, especially to engage in romantic relationships: I suspect her husband has been sneaking around. I think his wife was sneaking around on him.
See also: around, sneak

sneak up

v.
1. To move or operate furtively or surreptitiously toward someone: The thief sneaked up behind the tourists and stole their luggage.
2. sneak up on To approach suddenly and surprisingly: The first day of spring sneaked up on me and I still hadn't gone skiing yet. Don't sneak up on me like that!
See also: sneak, up
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

sneak

n. a sneak preview of a movie. There was a good sneak at the Granada last night.

sneaks

n. sneakers. She wore red sneaks and a mini.
See also: sneak
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

sneak the sunrise past a rooster

Attempt something that's impossible, or be slick enough to do something by stealth. This predominantly Southern expression was famously used by California Angels first baseman Joe Adock, who said that “trying to sneak a pitch past [Atlanta Braves hitting great] Hank Aaron is like trying to sneak the sunrise past a rooster.”
See also: past, rooster, sneak
Endangered Phrases by Steven D. Price Copyright © 2011 by Steven D. Price
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
The company is offering the Sneak Peek Week, from October 28, 2011, with a selection of vacation packages at the same rate as its upcoming annual sale.
Self-proclaimed house gangster Sneak has helped shape the course of dance music since the early 1990s.
snuck has risen to the status of standard and to approximate equality with sneaked."
QB sneaks are common in this situation, especially if the ball is butted up against the goal line.
Learning more about DAF could offer new ways to stop CVBs and related viruses from using it to sneak into cells, Bergelson adds.
"People will try to sneak these things in, but how you can sneak a tiger in?
But his spokesman said the trip would probably be a low key affair -``a sneak in, sneak out situation''.
In January or February, I'm going to sneak back in and play a round or two on the mini-golf course!"
Pete's Summer Brew will be sold through September, supported by a new "Sneak One While You Can" promotion that features a "Summer Sneakstakes" giveaway.
A sneak preview of what designers are offering for the coming fall and winter season will take your breath away.
And a feature called "Sneak Peak" tells at a glance whether a short list of user-specified parameters are in statistical control.
Specifically, the use of "sneak and peek" warrants by law enforcement officers has raised questions regarding compliance with the Fourth Amendment prohibition against unreasonable searches and the Rule 41 notice requirement.
Not surprisingly, we find a lot more quotable anthropology, philosophy, or theology in Cathy," "Calvin and Hobbes," "The Far Side," or "Doonesbury" than "Batman" or "Brenda Starr." The reason for this seems fairly simple to me--the things we joke about or lampoon are often the very issues we feel the strongest about, and not infrequently humor, whether light or biting, is the only way we know to sneak up on the really important questions of life.
Follett Software Company has released Sneak Previews Plus, a new multimedia CD-ROM product designed to enhance the book acquisitions process within the school or library environment.