snarl at (one)

(redirected from snarling at)

snarl at (one)

1. Literally, to growl at one in a vicious manner and with teeth bared. I knew not to approach the dog when it started snarling at me. The poor woman was so overcome by delirium that she actually snarled at the doctors and nurses.
2. To speak or respond to one in a particularly nasty or aggressive manner. She positively snarled at me when I suggested that she should take a break to focus on her kids. If you snarl at me like that again, I'm sending you straight to bed.
3. To utter something at one in a particularly nasty or aggressive manner. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "snarl" and "at." He snarled his answer at me, so I knew not to push him any further. I got so sick of the coach snarling orders at us, so I quit the team.
See also: snarl

snarl at (someone, something, or an animal)

to growl at someone, something, or an animal angrily and threateningly. The dog snarled at everyone who passed by. Our dog used to sit in front of the washing machine and snarl at it.
See also: snarl
References in classic literature ?
The two dogs were whimpering and snarling at his feet, but she took no notice of them.
"It is alleged that one of the dogs was snarling at the man and his pet so he used his dog ball launcher to keeping the animals at bay.
This is not the first time I've seen small dogs snarling at other dogs.
And leaping in the air while snarling at an opponent like a demented rottweiler is a new yoga position used to promote inner calm?
His neighbour-from-hell tactics included growling and snarling at them and throwing garden furniture over the fence.
"Tell Gary if he wants to talk to me to pick up the damn phone," I remember snarling at my assistant.
His snarling at one international accord after another besmirches the United States and makes the world a more dangerous place.
"He started keeping me caged in our porch for hours on end growling and snarling at me.
For example, "a young couple kissing' was assigned 5, "two dancers' was assigned 0 (for undefined or neutral emotional tone and involvement) and "two dogs snarling at each other' was assigned -3.
"When I came to interview her she seemed worse for wear and was slurring and snarling at me - she just wouldn't talk to me so I didn't hang around.
The dog went berserk, barking and snarling at passers-by as the four-year-old wept in fear.