snail's pace


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

snail's pace

A very slow, arduous pace or rate. My research is moving at a snail's pace—every experiment I've tried so far has failed. We're never going to recoup our development costs if the snail's pace of these sales doesn't pick up.
See also: pace

snail's pace

A very slow pace, as in They're making progress with testing the new vaccine, but at a snail's pace. [c. 1400]
See also: pace
References in periodicals archive ?
New Delhi [India], June 13 ( ANI ): The passengers of the Delhi blue line metro service today faced a technical snag as the line that connects Noida and Vaishali to Dwarka ran at a snail's pace around 5 p.
Given that the court process on bail petition should be summary in nature, the case is really moving at a snail's pace, sometimes it is not moving at all, it's stationary, Estrada said in a statement.
Billowed smoke covered the skies of most of the emirates roads and traffic, especially in the industrial areas, slowed down to a snail's pace as most roads were cordoned off to allow fire fighters easy access to the blaze.
His dad Pankaj Kapur's directorial debut is also moving at snail's pace.
This is a step in the fight direction, but unfortunately the ELI moves at a snail's pace," he said.
As long as you keep your form and let your muscles do the work, going at a snail's pace doesn't help a bit.
Simply fire the workers we now have working at a snail's pace and hire the workers from those cities.
For generations the remaining bottomland forests of the Mississippi River and its tributaries have survived as places where trees grow large, shadows grow deep, and sinuous rivers and streams move at a snail's pace.
In their June 13 report, they expressed concern about the snail's pace at which proven road-tested technologies like CTI were being accepted by government regulators.
In Selma, the voter registration office was open only two days a month, and officials moved at a snail's pace, registering about 150 black voters a year.
But when it comes to the Internet service on his computer, the businessman from Oklahoma City is moving at a snail's pace.
Well, lucky for you the tempo slows to a snail's pace.
PRE-SEASON continues apace at Weymouth - a snail's pace, that is.
because Havret was going round at such a snail's pace.
Safety considerations must be paramount, of course, but are we alone in finding it difficult to remember British summers of 30 years ago forcing the trains to slow to snail's pace.