smuggle

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smuggle (someone or something) across

To transport someone or something across (some place or border) in a surreptitious or hidden manner, especially when it is illegal to do so. A: "I really miss the fresh salami they make back home, but I can't bring it through customs with me." B: "I'll try to smuggle some across for you the next time I come to visit." The man was sentenced to 10 years in prison for smuggling people across the border.
See also: across, smuggle

smuggle (someone or something) into (some place)

To transport someone or something into some place in a surreptitious or hidden manner, especially when it is illegal to do so. A: "I really miss the fresh salami they make back home, but I can't bring it through customs with me." B: "I'll try to smuggle some into the country for you the next time I come to visit." I tried smuggling my friend into the party by having her hide in a suitcase that I said had stereo equipment in it.
See also: smuggle

smuggle (someone or something) out (of some place)

To transport someone or something out (of some place) in a surreptitious or hidden manner, especially when it is illegal to do so. A: "I really miss the fresh salami they make back home, but I can't bring it through customs with me." B: "I'll try to smuggle some out for you the next time I come to visit." We smuggled her out the building in an empty cello case.
See also: out, smuggle

smuggle (someone or something) past (someone or something)

To transport someone or something across some border or past a person or organization who monitors such a border in a surreptitious or hidden manner, especially when it is illegal to do so. A: "I really miss the fresh salami they make back home, but I can't bring it through customs with me." B: "I'll try to smuggle some past customs for you the next time I come to visit." They had been smuggling drugs past the border patrol by hiding them inside of tubs of ice cream.
See also: past, smuggle

smuggle (someone or something) through (something or some place)

To transport someone or something across some border or past an organization that monitors it in a surreptitious or hidden manner, especially when it is illegal to do so. A: "I really miss the fresh salami they make back home, but I can't bring it through customs with me." B: "I'll try to smuggle some through customs for you the next time I come to visit." I managed to smuggle nearly three pounds of weed through the border.
See also: smuggle, through

smuggle in

1. To transport someone or something in (to something or some place) in a surreptitious or hidden manner, especially when it is illegal to do so. A noun or pronoun can be used between "smuggle" and "in." A: "I really miss the fresh salami they make back home, but I can't bring it through customs." B: "I'll try to smuggle in a bit of it with me the next time I come to visit." I tried smuggling my friend in the party by having her hide in a suitcase that I said had stereo equipment in it.
2. To hide someone or something inside of something in order to transport them or it without being seen or noticed, especially when it is illegal to do so. A noun or pronoun is used between "smuggle" and "in." He was caught smuggling narcotics in his luggage. The group ran an operation smuggling runaway slaves in coffins that they transported in wagons from the South to the North.
See also: smuggle

smuggle someone or something across something

to move someone or something across a border illegally and in secret. The terrorists smuggled one of their number across the border last night. Larry helped smuggle contraband across the border.
See also: across, smuggle

smuggle someone or something into some place

 and smuggle someone or something in
to move someone or something across a border into a place illegally and in secret. The secret agent smuggled his family into the country and then defected. He smuggled in his family. smuggle someone or something out of some place and smuggle someone or something out* to move someone or something across a border out of a place illegally and in secret. Judy smuggled her cousin out of the country in a van. she smuggled out her cousin.
See also: place, smuggle

smuggle someone or something past

(someone or something) to move something past a guard or monitor illegally and in secret. We failed in our attempt to smuggle Mary past the border. It is easy to smuggle wine past the border guards.
See also: past, smuggle

smuggle someone or something through

(something) to move something through a guard post or other barrier illegally and in secret. The officers smuggled the child through the barrier so he could be with his mother. We smuggled some other goods through, too.
See also: smuggle, through