smuggle

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smuggle (someone or something) across

To transport someone or something across (some place or border) in a surreptitious or hidden manner, especially when it is illegal to do so. A: "I really miss the fresh salami they make back home, but I can't bring it through customs with me." B: "I'll try to smuggle some across for you the next time I come to visit." The man was sentenced to 10 years in prison for smuggling people across the border.
See also: across, smuggle

smuggle (someone or something) in (something or some place)

1. To transport someone or something in (to something or some place) in a surreptitious or hidden manner, especially when it is illegal to do so. A: "I really miss the fresh salami they make back home, but I can't bring it through customs." B: "I'll try to smuggle some in with me the next time I come to visit." I tried smuggling my friend in the party by having her hide in a suitcase that I said had stereo equipment in it.
2. To hide someone or something inside of something in order to transport them or it without being seen or noticed, especially when it is illegal to do so. He was caught smuggling narcotics in his luggage. The group ran an operation smuggling runaway slaves in coffins that they transported in wagons from the South to the North.
See also: smuggle

smuggle (someone or something) into (some place)

To transport someone or something into some place in a surreptitious or hidden manner, especially when it is illegal to do so. A: "I really miss the fresh salami they make back home, but I can't bring it through customs with me." B: "I'll try to smuggle some into the country for you the next time I come to visit." I tried smuggling my friend into the party by having her hide in a suitcase that I said had stereo equipment in it.
See also: smuggle

smuggle (someone or something) past (someone or something)

To transport someone or something across some border or past a person or organization who monitors such a border in a surreptitious or hidden manner, especially when it is illegal to do so. A: "I really miss the fresh salami they make back home, but I can't bring it through customs with me." B: "I'll try to smuggle some past customs for you the next time I come to visit." They had been smuggling drugs past the border patrol by hiding them inside of tubs of ice cream.
See also: past, smuggle

smuggle (someone or something) through (something or some place)

To transport someone or something across some border or past an organization that monitors it in a surreptitious or hidden manner, especially when it is illegal to do so. A: "I really miss the fresh salami they make back home, but I can't bring it through customs with me." B: "I'll try to smuggle some through customs for you the next time I come to visit." I managed to smuggle nearly three pounds of weed through the border.
See also: smuggle, through

smuggle someone or something across something

to move someone or something across a border illegally and in secret. The terrorists smuggled one of their number across the border last night. Larry helped smuggle contraband across the border.
See also: across, smuggle

smuggle someone or something into some place

 and smuggle someone or something in
to move someone or something across a border into a place illegally and in secret. The secret agent smuggled his family into the country and then defected. He smuggled in his family. smuggle someone or something out of some place and smuggle someone or something out* to move someone or something across a border out of a place illegally and in secret. Judy smuggled her cousin out of the country in a van. she smuggled out her cousin.
See also: place, smuggle

smuggle someone or something past

(someone or something) to move something past a guard or monitor illegally and in secret. We failed in our attempt to smuggle Mary past the border. It is easy to smuggle wine past the border guards.
See also: past, smuggle

smuggle someone or something through

(something) to move something through a guard post or other barrier illegally and in secret. The officers smuggled the child through the barrier so he could be with his mother. We smuggled some other goods through, too.
See also: smuggle, through
References in periodicals archive ?
Based on the proposal, the BOC will ascertain the quality of smuggled rice and will only need the signatures of the BOC and NFA heads before its distribution.
The President issued the directive a few days after the destruction of smuggled luxury cars in Manila, Cebu, and Davao.
He said that under the cover of Afghan Transit Trade, the Afghan imports are back smuggled into Pakistan with the help of Afghan traders.
He added that the companies involved in the smuggling to Lebanon were forced to pay fines that are equal to the value of the smuggled goods.
As many as 20 famous cigarette brands, which neither have import licenses nor are produced in the country, come under this plan and are subject to confiscation as smuggled goods wherever they are found," he said.
Worth of legal imported soap container is 4,753,812 rupees while worth of illegal smuggled container is 4,093,390 rupees, if one 40 feet container has smuggled it bestow 660,422 rupees loss to government treason.
The suspect pleaded guilty and admitted that he smuggled the drugs.
Buying and selling of smuggled goods; fraudulent documents; corruption; transnational organized crime; and other crime are related to each other.
Further, the majority of consumers who buy smuggled goods are between the age group of 18 and 45, according to a study conducted by the Euromonitor Research Associate.
Smuggled diesel is even sold on the street in some cases.
The government is considering new legislation regulating customs transactions and toughening penalties on customs smuggling, particularly in free zones, as part of larger efforts to protect industries from smuggled goods.
The tanker had reportedly picked up the diesel fuel from small vessels selling smuggled fuel in the Persian Gulf waters.
In recent weeks authorities in Nepal have made seizures of gold smuggled from China for use in the domestic market and sent illegally by road to India.
Karras provocatively suggests that, in their search for legitimacy, modern states were reluctant to have any serious confrontation with that fairly large section of society that benefitted from smuggling (smugglers, consumers of smuggled goods, and corrupt officials).