smoke

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smoke

1. n. a tobacco cigarette; a pipe of tobacco; a cigar. I think I’ll have a smoke now.
2. n. the act of smoking anything smokable, including drugs. I need a smoke—of anything. I’m going to stop here for a smoke.
3. n. methyl alcohol; bad liquor; any liquor. They call it smoke because when you mix it with water and shake it, it’s cloudy.
4. n. exaggeration; deception. (see also blow smoke, smoke and mirrors.) If the smoke is too obvious, they’ll just get suspicious.
5. tv. to annihilate someone; to shoot someone. (Underworld.) Rocko tried time and time again to smoke Marlowe, always without success.
6. tv. to beat someone in a contest; to outrun, outdistance, or outplay someone. Jill smoked Dave in the bicycle race.
See:
References in classic literature ?
Some of the deep gorges and defiles sent up sheets of flame, and clouds of lurid smoke, and sparks and cinders that in the night made them resemble the craters of volcanoes.
In the daytime, the mountains were wrapped in smoke so dense and blinding, that the explorers, if by chance they separated, could only find each other by shouting.
"No salt mines this time, Smoke. But I'll tell you what--I'll lay odds of five to one it's the Macedonia."
The smoke was still miles astern, but overhauling us rapidly, when we lowered our boats.
Under the approaching smoke the hull and upper-works of a steamer were growing larger.
Either or Both Youth Sample N % Parents Smoke Smokes Weekly
Geier Jr., chairman and CEO of The Interpublic Group of Cos., a $1 billion international organization of advertising agencies, smokes an average of three to four cigars a day--mostly on the job to avoid scolding from his wife.
Studies have shown that lung cancer in active smokers is dose related: The longer and more a person smokes, the more likely his or her chance of dying from the disease.
A new study now suggests that genes exert a moderate influence on all aspects of smoking--even on how much one smokes.
In addition, children whose parents smoke (particularly if the mother smokes) have a higher prevalence of bronchitis, pneumonia, wheezing, coughing, and middle ear disease.
Whether it's a party or lunch, there are going to be smokes," says Kevin McNamara, an 18-year-old Robinson senior and a regular attendee at the basement brunch.
"Sadly, there aren't a lot of population-based studies we can point to and say, `One of eight lesbians will get cancer during her lifetime' or `One of five lesbians smokes,'" says Cheryl Fields, health education director for the Mautner Project.
I don't know one person who smokes because it's cool."
The risk that a nonsmoking woman will develop lung cancer may depend in part on whether her husband smokes, but not on her childhood exposure to a smoking parent.
For every cigarette a person smokes, he or she inhales about 1 to 3 mg of nicotine.