smithereens


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be blasted to smithereens

To be blown up or broken apart into tiny, fragmentary pieces. "Smithereens," first appearing in English in 1829 as "smiddereens," is likely derived from the Irish word "smidirín" or "smidiríní," meaning "fragment." I wish I could still go visit our old family home, but it's already been blasted to smithereens by the demolition crew. The village was blasted to smithereens by the typhoon's gale-force winds.
See also: blasted, smithereens

be blown to smithereens

To be blown up or broken apart into tiny, fragmentary pieces. "Smithereens," first appearing in English in 1829 as "smiddereens," is likely derived from the Irish word "smidirín" or "smidiríní," meaning "fragment." I wish I could still go visit our old family home, but it's already been blown to smithereens by the demolition crew. The village was blown to smithereens by the typhoon's gale-force winds.
See also: blown, smithereens

be smashed to smithereens

To be broken apart or otherwise destroyed into tiny, fragmentary pieces. "Smithereens," first appearing in English in 1829 as "smiddereens," is likely derived from the Irish word "smidirín" or "smidiríní," meaning "fragment." I wish I could still go visit our old family home, but it's already been smashed to smithereens by the demolition crew. The village was smashed to smithereens by the typhoon's gale-force winds.
See also: smashed, smithereens

blast to smithereens

To explode or otherwise destroy something into tiny, fragmentary pieces. Smithereens, first appearing in 1829 as "smiddereens," is likely derived from the Irish word "smidirín" or "smidiríní," meaning fragment. The demolition crew came in and blasted the house to smithereens. The small band of rebels didn't stand a chance; they were blasted to smithereens as soon as the loyalists had them in sight.
See also: blast, smithereens

blow (something) to smithereens

To break or destroy something into tiny, fragmentary pieces. (Smithereens, first appearing in English in 1829 as "smiddereens," is likely derived from the Irish word "smidirín" or "smidiríní," meaning fragment.) The demolition crew blew the building to smithereens in a matter of seconds. The typhoon's gale-force winds have been blowing the village to smithereens over the last few days.
See also: blow, smithereens

hack (something) to smithereens

To alter something significantly by removing pieces of it, often in a clumsy or aggressive manner. Can be used literally or figuratively. ("Smithereens," meaning "bits," comes from Irish Gaelic.) Quit hacking the roast to smithereens and just let Dad cut it, will you? I thought I'd written a strong proposal—until my boss hacked it to smithereens, that is.
See also: hack, smithereens

smash (something) to smithereens

To break or destroy something into tiny, fragmentary pieces. "Smithereens," first appearing in English in 1829 as "smiddereens," is likely derived from the Irish word "smidirín" or "smidiríní," meaning "fragment." The demolition crew brought in the wrecking ball, which smashed the house to smithereens in a matter of hours. The typhoon's gale-force winds have been smashing the village to smithereens over the last few days.
See also: smash, smithereens

blow someone or something to smithereens

 and blow someone or something to bits; blow someone or something to pieces
Lit. to explode someone or something into tiny pieces. (See also blow something to smithereens.) The bomb blew the ancient church to smithereens. The explosion blew the tank to bits. The explosion blew the car to pieces.
See also: blow, smithereens

blow something to smithereens

 and blow something to bits; blow something to pieces
Fig. to destroy an idea or plan by exposing its faults. (See also blow someone or something to smithereens.) The discovery blew my case to pieces. The opposing lawyer blew my case to smithereens.
See also: blow, smithereens

blow, smash, etc. something to smitheˈreens

(informal) destroy something completely by breaking it into small pieces: The bomb blew the car to smithereens.

blow(n) to smithereens

Smash, destroy. Again, blow here means “explode,” and smithereens probably means “little smithers,” a dialect word thought to mean “bits” or “pieces.” The term was appealing enough to be used often from the early nineteenth century on, even by that great wordsmith James Joyce (“Crew and cargo in smithereens,” in Ulysses, 1922).
See also: smithereens
References in periodicals archive ?
"I know accidents happen but you don't expect to come back and find your car smashed to smithereens. It was badly damaged at the front and the back.
The Smithereens peaked in the late 1980s and early 1990s but continued to tour and record their more recent albums, including "2011" and "The Smithereens Play Tommy," a tribute to the Whos rock opera.
He said that PPPP had always practiced reconciliatory politics, while others had shredded Charter of democracy to smithereens with their undemocratic behaviour.
He said that PPPP had always practiced 'reconciliatory politics', while others had shredded Charter of democracy' to smithereens with their 'undemocratic behaviour'.
Perhaps she should focus her efforts on persuading moderate Muslims to ostracise those who preach radicalism - radical Muslims who try and blow themselves and innocent people to smithereens.
But little thought is given to the fact that terrorists with nuclear power could blow us to smithereens at any time.
Even if it means the prospect of Mr Bond doing something spectacular to smash it to smithereens.
Vehicles had been blown to smithereens, human beings ripped to pieces." Much of the memoir has the same swaggering tone.
The site was located near a nature reserve with wetlands, he said, speculating that migratory birds would be "splattered to smithereens" by the turbines.
You do not win the hearts and minds of people by bombing their country to smithereens. You only create more terrorists.
This means that if the vehicle rolls while the roof is up, the bars will protrude through the rear window, shattering it to smithereens.
Loner Gaia Moore, protagonist of Francine Pascal's Fearless series, graduates from Stanford, and her future looks bright until Kevin, her only college acquaintance, straps a bomb to himself and threatens to blow the student body to smithereens. Unable to experience fear, Gaia dives off the rooftop, taking Kevin along with her.
He throws in an interesting twist in the midst of all of this brokering which pretty much blows the entire deal to smithereens. In a world of breweries, geisha girls, and art mistresses, sex seems to be part of the corporate formula.
"What really got attention in Norway was that [the reef] was being destroyed--well, smashed to smithereens," says Watling.
His only strategy to address injustice is to blow it to smithereens. And so the myth of redemptive violence gets played out one more time.