smell to high heaven


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Related to smell to high heaven: come up smelling like a rose

smell to high heaven

1. To have a very strong unpleasant scent. Can you take this trash out? It smells to high heaven. Ugh, something in this refrigerator smells to high heaven!
2. To be or seem extremely disreputable, suspicious, or corrupt. This deal between the company and the mayor's office smells to high heaven, if you ask me. This town smelled to high heaven before I came in and brought some law and order to it.
See also: heaven, high, smell, to
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

smell to (high) heaven

 
1. Go to stink to high heaven.
2. Fig. to give signals that cause suspicion. This deal is messed up. It smells to high heaven. something's wrong here. Somebody blabbed. This setup smells to high heaven.
See also: heaven, smell, to
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

smell/stink to high ˈheaven

(informal)
1 have a very strong and unpleasant smell: When was the last time you cleaned the dog kennel? It stinks to high heaven.
2 seem to be very dishonest or morally unacceptable: This whole deal stinks to high heaven. I’m sure somebody was bribed.
See also: heaven, high, smell, stink, to
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

smell to heaven

verb
See also: heaven, smell, to

smell to (high) heaven

1. in. to smell very bad. This kitchen smells to high heaven. What besides garlic are you cooking?
2. in. to give signals that cause suspicion. Something’s wrong here. Somebody blabbed. This setup smells to high heaven.
See also: heaven, high, smell, to
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

smell to high heaven, to

To stink; to be thoroughly contemptible, dishonest, or in very bad repute. Heaven in this term alludes to a great distance; if something that far away can be smelled, it must smell very strong indeed. Shakespeare may have originated the metaphor. “O! my offence is rank, it smells to heaven,” says the King in Hamlet (3.3), “It hath the primal eldest curse on’t; A brother’s murder!”
See also: high, smell, to
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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