smear (someone or something) with (something)

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smear (someone or something) with (something)

1. To spread or daub some substance onto someone or something. I came into the kitchen and saw that our toddler had smeared the walls with chocolate. The leader smeared the warriors with paint to intimidate their foes.
2. To damage or attempt to ruin someone's or something's reputation through the perpetuation of claims or rumors about their failures or faults, whether these are true, exaggerated, or falsified. The president's reelection campaign has already begun smearing her opponent. The company argued that its competition had been trying to smear their reputation with false claims about using sweatshop labor in their manufacturing process.
See also: smear
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

smear someone or something with something

 
1. to spread or rub someone or something with some substance. Bitty smeared Bobby with mud and made him very angry. You should smear that burn with lotion. He smeared himself with grease and ruined his shirt.
2. to damage the reputation of someone or something by spreading serious charges or rumors. He smeared his opponent with all sorts of charges. The speaker smeared the entire city with his criticism.
See also: smear
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Women 21-29 years of age--obtain annual smears with HPV reflex test if result indicates ASCUS until the age of 30.
Sets (direct and stained sputum smear of a sample) of smears with discordant results were selected and read blindly by a second reader.
Prevention of i case of cervical cancer through screening annually rather than once at 3 years would require an additional 42,621 Pap smears and 2364 colposcopies for women aged <30 years; 69,665 Pap smears and 3861 colposcopies for women aged 30 to 44; and 209,324 Pap smears with 11,502 colposcopies for women aged 45 to 59.
Among the 34 smears with high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions, 23 were done in women while they were still HIV negative and 11, in women who had become HIV positive, a statistically significant difference.
Among the eight smears with carcinoma in situ, six were taken from women before HIV infection and two from women after HIV infection, Dr.
However, family physicians submitted more Pap smears with an absent endocervical component (AOR = 1.50; 95% CI, 1.07 - 2.11).
However, further analysis of the satisfactory but limited category showed that family physicians had higher rates of Pap smears with no endocervical cells noted (AOR = 1.60; 95% CI, 1.07 - 2.11).
The Cytobrush-spatula technique yielded 95.6% (108/113) smears with adequate endocervical cells, as compared with 69.7% (76/109) of smears obtained with the Dacron swab and spatula (P = [less than].0001, odds ratio 9.38).
In this study, the Cytobrush enhanced detection of cytologic atypia (15.9% vs 13.8%) for all smears; however, if only the smears with an adequate number of endocervical cells are included, the swab improves detection of cytologic atypia (19.7% vs 16.7%).
Routine cervical smear screening (Papanicolaou [Pap] smears) to identify cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) in the general population has been shown to be cost-effective and to lower the incidence of invasive cervical cancer.[1] It has become common practice in the United States to follow up abnormal cervical smears with colposcopy and directed biopsy to define the level of CIN or to detect the presence of invasive carcinoma.[2,3] Some researchers, however, have demonstrated a high regression rate of cervical low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (SILs).[4-9] This finding has led to controversy about whether to treat or to closely follow these lesions.
Kirby et al[1] followed 500 women with abnormal smears with mild or moderate dyskaryosis.
Jones et al[8] investigated patients with atypical but not dysplastic smears with repeat Pap smear, coposcopy, and biopsy.
Abnormal Papanicolaou smears after earlier smears with atypical squamous cells.
Papanicolaou smears with no endocervical cells were obtained in only 26.5% of the 1800[degrees] rotation group.
Vooijs et al[18] demonstrated a significantly greater number of epithelial cell abnormalities detected in smears with endocervical cells.