smash


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

all to smash

Completely destroyed or ruined, either literally or figuratively. After the accident, my car was all to smash. Their company is all to smash now that the stock market has plummeted.
See also: all, smash

smash (something) to smithereens

To break or destroy something into tiny, fragmentary pieces. "Smithereens," first appearing in English in 1829 as "smiddereens," is likely derived from the Irish word "smidirín" or "smidiríní," meaning "fragment." The demolition crew brought in the wrecking ball, which smashed the house to smithereens in a matter of hours. The typhoon's gale-force winds have been smashing the village to smithereens over the last few days.
See also: smash, smithereens

smash the teapot

To resume drinking alcohol after a time of sobriety. The "teapot" here is likely a reference to the term "teetotaler"—one who does not drink alcohol. A: "But Paul's been sober for years. Has he really smashed the teapot?" B: "Yes! I saw him drunkenly stumbling out of the pub last night."
See also: smash, teapot

blow (something) to smithereens

To break or destroy something into tiny, fragmentary pieces. (Smithereens, first appearing in English in 1829 as "smiddereens," is likely derived from the Irish word "smidirín" or "smidiríní," meaning fragment.) The demolition crew blew the building to smithereens in a matter of seconds. The typhoon's gale-force winds have been blowing the village to smithereens over the last few days.
See also: blow, smithereens

smash hit

A huge, widespread success. Usually said of entertainment media, such as books, films, plays, songs, etc. After the smash hit of her first novel, Mary was under a lot of pressure for her second effort to be just as successful. The band had been slowly gaining popularity over the years, but it wasn't until they're smash hit in 1987 that they hit the mainstream.
See also: hit, smash

smash (one's) head in

To strike one in the head or the head with intense, violent force. The cops arrested the man after he threatened to smash their heads in. Where's the guy who insulted you? I'm gonna go smash his head in!
See also: head, smash

smash in (one's) head

To strike one in the head or the head with intense, violent force. The cops arrested the man after he threatened to smash in their heads. Where's the guy who insulted you? I'm gonna go smash in his head!
See also: head, smash

smash (one's) face in

To strike one in the face or the head with intense, violent force. The cops arrested the man after he threatened to smash their faces in. Where's the guy who insulted you? I'm gonna go smash his face in!
See also: face, smash

smash in (one's) face

To strike one in the face or the head with intense, violent force. The cops arrested the man after he threatened to smash in their faces. Where's the guy who insulted you? I'm gonna go smash in his face!
See also: face, smash

smash in

1. To cause something to crush, crumple, or collapse by striking it or exerting a lot of force on it. A noun or pronoun can be used either before or after "in." The demolition crew smashed in the house with a wrecking ball. Stop standing on the box like that, or you'll end up smashing it in!
2. To strike or collide with someone in a particular body part with great, violent force. A noun or pronoun is used between "smash" and "in" to indicate who is being hit. She lobbed a brick over the wall, smashing a man on the other side in the face. The boxer smashed her opponent in the ribs with a devastating left hook.
See also: smash

smash into (someone or something)

1. To collide into someone or something with great, violent force. The poor kid was racing around the house and smashed into the coffee table at full speed. A cyclist smashed into me on the way to work this morning. I think I may have a cracked rib!
2. To cause someone or something to collide into someone or something with great, violent force. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "smash" and "into." The driver lost control of the vehicle and smashed it into the side of a building. The professional wrestler picked up his opponent and smashed him into the mat.
See also: smash

smash out of (something or some place)

To escape from something or some place by breaking through some barrier with great, violent force. The bear became enraged and smashed out of its holding pen. The suspect smashed out of the garage in a white SUV.
See also: of, out, smash

smash through (something)

1. To collide with and break through something with great, violent force. The suspect smashed through the police barrier in a stolen SUV. I nearly lost my life from fright when a bird came smashing through our living room window.
2. To cause someone or something to collide with and break through something with great, violent force. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "smash" and "through." Someone smashed a rock through my windscreen while we were in the movie theater! The pro wrestler picked up his opponent and smashed him through the wooden table on the ground outside the ring.
See also: smash, through

smash up

1. To break something into small pieces with great, violent force. A noun or pronoun can be used between "smash" and "up." My father went on a rampage around the house, smashing up anything he could get his hands on. The disgruntled ex-employee stole a photocopier from the office on his last day at work and smashed it up with a baseball bat in a field beside the office.
2. To cause a lot of damage or destruction to something or within some place. A noun or pronoun can be used between "smash" and "up." He was arrested for smashing up a local bar after getting into an argument with its owner. Some punks came around and smashed my car up during the night.
3. To beat someone with brutal, violent force. A noun or pronoun can be used between "smash" and "up." The gang surrounded the poor man and smashed him up so badly that he had to be hospitalized.
See also: smash, up

smash hit

a play, movie, musical, etc., that is a big success. Her first book was a smash hit. The second was a disaster. A smash hit doesn't always make people rich.
See also: hit, smash

smash into something

to crash into something; to bump or crash into something. Judy smashed into the coffee table and hurt her leg. The car smashed into the side of a bus and caused a lot of damage.
See also: smash

smash out of something

to break [one's way] out of something. The prisoner smashed out of his cell and ran. The horse smashed out of its stable.
See also: of, out, smash

smash someone's face in

 
1. Fig. to crush someone's face. The accident smashed Harry's face in, and he had to have extensive surgery. The accident smashed in his face.
2. Inf. to strike someone in the face. You had better stop that or I will smash your face in. Max tried to smash in Lefty's face.
See also: face, smash

smash something in

to crush something inward; to make something collapse inward by striking it. Andy gave one good kick and smashed the box in. Liz smashed in the window.
See also: smash

smash something up

to break something up; to destroy something. I hope the children don't smash any of the good china up if we use it tonight. The driver fell asleep and smashed up the car.
See also: smash, up

smash through something

to break [one's way] through some sort of barrier. The fleeing car smashed through the police barrier. Max got angry and smashed through the office door.
See also: smash, through

smash hit

An outstanding success, as in She was a smash hit in the role of the governess, or His first book was a smash hit but this one isn't doing well. [c. 1920]
See also: hit, smash

smash somebody’s ˈface/ˈhead in

(British English, informal) hit somebody very hard in the face/head: Give me the money or I’ll smash your head in.
See also: face, head, smash

a ˌsmash ˈhit

(informal) (of a record, play or film/movie) very popular and a great success: Still at number one, it’s The Rubber Band, with their smash hit, ‘Love me’.The actress Donna May has been in 15 Broadway smash hits.
See also: hit, smash

blow, smash, etc. something to smitheˈreens

(informal) destroy something completely by breaking it into small pieces: The bomb blew the car to smithereens.

smash

n. wine. (Streets. Because it is made from smashed grapes.) I got a bottle of smash in my car.
References in periodicals archive ?
But also in September, Zinser bought the Jamba Juice outlet at the University of Oregon, a competitor that he then converted to an Andrew Smash.
"The Smash Room is an alternative way to release stress, anger and any frustrations.
This change in setup will help you get the ball in the air more consistently with a smash factor of around 1.0, and give you the ability to make adjustments for different shots.
Nintendo's plans for E3 2018 focuses mainly on "Super Smash Bros." for the Switch, which was just announced last month in the form of a teaser trailer.
Its report found that 48 per cent of convenience store frontages have been smashed or damaged in the past three years - 16 per cent of them three times or more.
Into the ring stepped Zinser, 21, who last June assumed control of troubled parent/licensing company Smash International Inc.
The princess was at Cowes on the Isle of Wight to launch Wight Lightning, the first British challenge for the Americas Cup since 1987, when the bottle did not smash.
Located in Umm Suqueim Road in Al Quoz Industrial Area 4, this place lets you smash anything - from items as small as a wine glass to a 42-inch television set - in a controlled environment.
In a (https://www.facebook.com/katie.linendoll/videos/10154912273121421/) Facebook interview with tech journalist Katie Linendoll via (https://www.cnet.com/news/nintendo-switch-super-smash-bros-reggie-hints/?ftag=COS-05-10aaa0b&linkId=35309178) CNET , Nintendo president Reggie Fils-Aime hinted that a new Super Smash Bros. Switch title would likely be available on the new Nintendo console.
OUTLANE | Burglars used a pair of garden shears to smash a window and steal jewellery from the bedroom of a house on Quebec Road on September 11.
A PENSIONER involved in a road smash near Lichfield has died in hospital.
But as she posed against the window of the shop she managed to smash the glass by leaning against it with her feet.
A JEWELLERY shop in Coventry city centre has suffered its third smash and grab robbery in less than three months.
The smash happened on a road between a housing estate and allotments in Ashington.
Mike Monaghan of Headford Anglers said "This person went to an awful lot of bother in the space of a 36-hour period to smash all of those stones."