smack of (something)

smack of (something)

To be strikingly reminiscent or suggestive of something; to give a strong indication or implication of something. Their whole PR statement about the firing smacks of corporate greed and incompetence. The judge's sudden reversal of his decision smacks of bribery or corruption, if you ask me.
See also: of, smack
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

smack of something

to be reminiscent of something; to imply something. The whole scheme smacked of dishonesty and deception. All of this story smacks of illegal practices.
See also: of, smack
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

smack of

v.
1. To have the distinctive flavor or taste of something: The soup smacks of garlic.
2. To give an indication of something; be suggestive of something: The city's reluctance to investigate the murder smacked of corruption.
See also: of, smack
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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