smack of

smack of (something)

To be strikingly reminiscent or suggestive of something; to give a strong indication or implication of something. Their whole PR statement about the firing smacks of corporate greed and incompetence. The judge's sudden reversal of his decision smacks of bribery or corruption, if you ask me.
See also: of, smack

smack of something

to be reminiscent of something; to imply something. The whole scheme smacked of dishonesty and deception. All of this story smacks of illegal practices.
See also: of, smack

smack of

v.
1. To have the distinctive flavor or taste of something: The soup smacks of garlic.
2. To give an indication of something; be suggestive of something: The city's reluctance to investigate the murder smacked of corruption.
See also: of, smack
References in classic literature ?
However, since he seems a friend of yours, here goes--" And with the gladdest, most grateful sound in the world, the happy smack of a fish back home again in the water, after an appalling three minutes spent on land, that prophetic trout was once more an active unit in God's populous universe.
I'd be the better for a smack of the salt water again, and a whiff of the breeze.