slunk


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slink out

To exit or depart (from some place) in a quiet, sneaky, inconspicuous, or furtive manner. The would-be burglar slunk out of the house after hit the alarm. I knew the teacher wanted to lecture me about the poor results on my test, so I made a plan to slink out as soon as the bell rang. No matter who I'm rooting for, it always breaks my heart to watch the losing team slink out at the end of the game.
See also: out, slink

slink off

To leave or retreat in a quiet, sneaky, inconspicuous, or furtive manner. The would-be burglar slunk off after tripping the alarm. I knew the teacher wanted to lecture me about the poor results on my test, so I made a plan to slink off as soon as the bell rang. No matter who I'm rooting for, it always breaks my heart to watch the losing team slink off the field at the end of the game.
See also: off, slink

slink away

To leave or retreat in a quiet, sneaky, inconspicuous, or furtive manner. The would-be burglar slunk away after tripping the alarm. I knew the teacher wanted to lecture me about the poor results on my test, so I made a plan to slink away as soon as the bell rang. No matter who I'm rooting for, it always breaks my heart to watch the losing team slink away at the end of the game.
See also: away, slink

slink about

To move about in a quiet, sneaky, inconspicuous, or furtive manner. There were some suspicious figures slinking about in the shadows, so we decided to go a different way home. The boss is always slinking about the office, making sure everyone is being productive. The dog slunk about to see if anyone would give him scraps from the table.
See also: slink

slink around

To move around in a quiet, sneaky, inconspicuous, or furtive manner. There were some suspicious figures slinking around in the shadows, so we decided to go a different way home. The boss is always slinking around the office, making sure everyone is being productive. The dog slunk around to see if anyone would give him scraps from the table.
See also: around, slink

slink in

To enter some place in a quiet, sneaky, inconspicuous, or furtive manner. The burglar slunk in without making a sound. Marty came slinking in the room, late to class as usual.
See also: slink

slink into (some place)

To enter some place in a quiet, sneaky, inconspicuous, or furtive manner. The burglar slunk into the house without making a sound. Marty came slinking into the room, late to class as usual.
See also: slink

slink around

to creep or slither around furtively. The cat slunk around, waiting for a chance to get at the bird. Don't slink around like that. Someone is likely to take you for a robber.
See also: around, slink

slink away

to creep or slither away furtively. The fox slunk away, leaving the henhouse as quietly as such a thing is possible. I hope that the skunk will slink away as quietly as it came.
See also: away, slink

slink in(to something)

to creep into something. The cat slunk into the hallway and lay down in the middle of the floor. I left the door ajar and a cat slunk in.
See also: slink

slink off

to creep away furtively. Carl was embarrassed and tried to slink off, but the ushers spotted him. The boys slunk off from the picnic and smoked some cigarettes.
See also: off, slink

slink out (of some place)

to creep out of some place furtively. The fox slunk out of the henhouse just as the farmer came out. It slunk out and got away.
See also: out, slink

slink away

Also, slink off. Depart furtively, as in The shoplifter slipped an item into his coat pocket and slunk away, or After that severe scolding, she slunk off. This term employs slink in the sense of "move stealthily," a usage dating from the late 1300s.
See also: away, slink
References in periodicals archive ?
And the girls slunk back to their hotel as they realised they were going to miss out on No1 to Flo-Rida's Club Can't Handle Me.
Kicking off with Business As Usual, the Hollywood funk legends slunk into the aptly-titled Old Folks Boogie, before ending up in, Oh Atlanta.
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Peace was restored but just hours later it was 33-year-old Vicky who slunk off to the neighbouring hotel for a night.
So in 1923 she slunk, resigned, into Gunta Stolzl's weaving workshop ("fate put into my hands limp threads") and stuck with fabric for the rest of her life.
As the scum who shamed the name of Scotland slunk back from Spain yesterday, they wore the three lions of ENGLAND.
I slunk back to the studios to be told: 'Don't worry, Mottie, it's unlikely anyone in Britain will have noticed' - but I was mortified."
The last time I saw Vanessa she'd slunk off into a corner to have a good giggle.
Shaken Scot John Higgins slunk home in shame last night after his 9-4 humbling by Gary Ponting at the Liverpool Victoria UK Snooker Championship in Preston.
They pair slunk back into their taxi, looking glassy-eyed, after celebrating the band's fourth birthday at Mahiki club in London's West End.
Keeper Paul Jones slunk back to QPR after winning his 50th - and possibly his last - cap in a 5-1 mauling by Slovakia with the added embarrassment of having had the number 50 and an image of the Welsh dragon shaved into his head for the occasion.
The bulky forward slunk away to a chorus of guffaws, cheers and roars of "rumbled!"
Many people would have slunk off into the shadows if they had endured what this modest young man suffered.
Yours truly slunk off to the London Marriott Hotel last night to watch the Real Fight Club where eight pairs of gloved-up thugs - brokers actually, but who's counting?