slough

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Related to sloughs: sloughs of despond

slough of despond

A state of severe depression. The phrase originated in John Bunyan's 17th-century novel A Pilgrim's Progress. I started going to therapy once I felt myself slipping into the slough of despond.
See also: of, slough

slough off

1. Literally, to shed, peel, or scrape off an outer layer of something. In this usage, a noun can be used between "slough" and "off." It can be pretty gross to watch a snake slough off its skin, leaving behind a weird, hollow version of itself.
2. To dismiss, ignore, or minimize the importance of someone or something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "slough" and "off." He kept heckling me during the show, but I sloughed him off and kept performing. The senator just sloughed off the journalist's comments, describing them later as "baseless" and "incendiary."
3. To procrastinate or avoid doing work. In this usage, the phrase is sometimes followed by a noun indicating the thing being avoided. If you keep sloughing off, we'll be forced to give you a formal warning. I decided to slough off my essay for the weekend and hang out with my friends instead.
4. To delegate or assign one's own work or duties to someone else. In this usage, a noun can be used between "slough" and "off," and the phrase is typically followed by "to/onto (someone)." More and more administrative duties are being sloughed off onto teachers, without being reflected in their pay. He's been sloughing smaller projects off to his assistants.
5. To escape or depart for some location quietly or in secret. In this usage, the phrase is sometimes followed by "to/into (some place)." I felt really uncomfortable in the group of strangers, so I sloughed off when everyone was distracted. We decided to skip the meeting and sloughed off to the movies instead.
See also: off, slough

slewed

slang Very drunk. We had nearly four bottles of wine at lunch, so we were all pretty good and slewed by the end of the meal. You were supposed to be getting things ready for our presentation tomorrow, but instead you spent the whole night getting slewed with your ex-boyfriend!
See also: slew

sluff off

1. Literally, to shed, peel, or scrape off an outer layer of something. In this usage, a noun can be used between "sluff" and "off." A less common variant of "slough off." It can be pretty gross to watch a snake sluff off its skin, leaving behind a weird, hollow version of itself.
2. To dismiss, ignore, or minimize the importance of someone or something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "sluff" and "off." A less common variant of "slough off." He kept heckling me during the show, but I sluffed him off and kept performing. The senator just sluffed off the journalist's comments, describing them later as "baseless" and "incendiary."
3. To procrastinate or avoid doing work. In this usage, the phrase is sometimes followed by a noun indicating the thing being avoided. A less common variant of "slough off." If you keep sluffing off, we'll be forced to give you a formal warning. I decided to sluff off my essay for the weekend and hang out with my friends instead.
See also: off, sluff

slough something off

 
1. Lit. to brush or rub something off. The snake sloughed its old skin off. It sloughed off its skin.
2. Fig. to ignore or disregard a negative remark or incident. I could see that the remark had hurt her feelings, but she just pretended to slough it off. Liz sloughed off the remark.
See also: off, slough

slough off

v.
1. To shed or peel off some outer layer, especially by rubbing or scraping: We need to slough the paint off the pipes before we install them. The snake sloughed off its skin against a rock.
2. To shed or peel off, as an outer layer: My skin is sloughing off because of the dryness.
3. To avoid some work or to work lazily: Your grades are bad because you've been sloughing off your homework a lot recently. After lunch, he sloughed off and played video games.
4. To leave unnoticed; slip away: The kids sloughed off into the woods.
See also: off, slough

slewed

and slewy and slued and sloughed (up) (slud and ˈslui and slud...)
mod. alcohol intoxicated. Wallace is too slewed to drive.
See also: slew

sloughed up

verb
See slewed
See also: slough, up

sloughed

verb
See slewed
See also: slough

sluff (off)

and slough (off)
in. to waste time; to goof off. Watch him. He will sluff off if you don’t keep after him.
See also: off, sluff

slough off

verb
See also: off, slough

slough

verb
References in periodicals archive ?
By comparison, little is known about fish that use the ponds and adjacent sloughs.
The purpose of the present study was to improve our understanding of fishery resources that use salt ponds and sloughs in South San Francisco Bay, and identify the key environmental variables that influence distribution of fish.
MATERIALS AND METHODS--Study Area--The study area consisted of two salt-pond complexes and associated sloughs in South San Francisco Bay--the Alviso complex in Santa Clara and Alameda counties, and the Eden Landing complex in Alameda County (Fig.
In 1946, the Pajaro Valley Rod and Gun Club (PVRGC) initialed a late spring-early summer angling derby for elasmobranchs in Elkhorn Slough.
In addition to the angling derbies, an archery derby for elasmobranchs in Elkhorn Slough was initiated in the mid 1980's and continued until the mid 1990's, but it took only a small traction of the elasmobranchs that were caught in the angling derbies.
From 1951 to 1962, Herald and several colleagues monitored and collected data at the Elkhorn Slough shark derbies.
CHARLESTON - Anyone can climb into a canoe or kayak and - if tides and winds are agreeable - get an up-close look at nature's big picture at the South Slough National Estuarine Reserve.
But to gain an appreciation of the complete picture - including many little things most visitors would never notice - it helps to see the slough at sea level with someone like Tom Gaskill.
Gaskill, education coordinator for the South Slough National Estuarine Reserve, leads monthly interpretive paddle tours of the estuary.
Turtles were live-trapped during the summer and early fall of 2001 in two sloughs in Clay County, Minnesota.
0001) between sloughs and when comparing males (P < 0.
The population of turtles in the smaller slough was morphologically smaller and presumably younger than the population in the larger slough.