slouch

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be no slouch

To be very hardworking, enthusiastic, and/or skillful. Tom might not be the friendliest coworker in the world, but he's no slouch when it comes to running the company's IT systems.
See also: no, slouch

no slouch

A phrase used to describe someone very hardworking, enthusiastic, and/or skillful. Tom might not be the friendliest coworker in the world, but he's no slouch when it comes to running the company's IT systems.
See also: no, slouch

slouch around

To loaf around (some place), as out of leisure, laziness, or boredom. After such a hectic week, I decided to spend the entire weekend slouching around reading books and watching TV. Instead of slouching around the office like that, why don't you go ask the boss for something to work on and actually make yourself useful?
See also: around, slouch

slouch behind (someone or something)

To droop or hunch behind someone or something, especially in an awkward or uncomfortable manner. The child slouched behind her parents nervously as they talked with her teacher about the incident. We all slouched behind the small partition to find a bit of shelter from the icy wind.
See also: behind, slouch

slouch down

To allow one's posture to slump or droop downward. I could see the kids starting to slouch down with boredom, so I knew it was time to start wrapping up the trip to the museum. Please stop slouching down in your chair like that—it's not good for your back!
See also: down, slouch

slouch over

To allow one's shoulders and head to slump, droop, or hunch forward or to one side. You need to stop slouching over like that while you work at the computer, or you'll give yourself major back pain down the line! Everyone in the meeting had started to slouch over, their eyes glossing over out of sheer boredom.
See also: over, slouch

slouch around

to move around with a stooped or bent body. (one may slouch because of age, illness, fatigue, depression, fear, or with the intention of not being observed.) she is slouching around because she is tired. Don't you slouch around when you are tired?
See also: around, slouch

slouch behind something

to remain behind something, slouching with depression, fear, or the intent of not being observed. Jim slouched behind a chair where no one could see him. A weary clerk slouched behind the counter, wanting a nap more than anything else.
See also: behind, slouch

slouch down

to slump or droop down. Don't always slouch down, Timmy! Stand up straight. I slouch down because I am tired.
See also: down, slouch

slouch down (in something)

to sink or snuggle down into something, trying to become less visible or more comfortable. Please don't slouch down in your chair, Tim. He can't sit in anything without slouching down.
See also: down, slouch

slouch over

to lean or crumple and fall to one side; [for someone] to collapse in a sitting position. He slouched over and went to sleep in his chair. When he slouched over, I thought something was wrong.
See also: over, slouch

be no ˈslouch (at something/at doing something)

(informal) be good at something/at doing something: He’s no slouch in the kitchen — you should try his spaghetti bolognese.
See also: no, slouch
References in periodicals archive ?
This paunch affects both heavy and thin women and can be attributed to slouching and poor sitting habits.
It encourages you to stay upright and not slump the lower back, and I found myself getting up from the desk for a quick stroll when my back became tired, rather than slouching in the chair.
Slouching, and other forms of poor posture can take a humongous toll on the shoulder.
Chiropractors urged sufferers to watch their posture and avoid slouching.
Overall, the worst position for the spine--as reflected in disk height--was the slouching position, followed closely by the upright 90-degree position, investigators at the University of Aberdeen (Scotland) reported.
Since their idea of upright includes the over-arching and tension, bringing them into balance will cause them to feel as if they are slouching or even leaning back.
Avoid slouching and running "behind your feet." Have a friend observe your form or try videotaping it on a track.
His new book, Skipping Towards Gomorrah: The Seven Deadly Sins and the Pursuit of Happiness in America (Dutton), is a popular antidote to the dour doomsday genre epitomized by Robert Bork's 1997 jeremiad on moral decay, Slouching Towards Gomorrah.
When tested on 30 individuals, the chair demonstrated an overall accuracy of 96% in determining whether they were slouching, leaning in various positions, crossing their legs, or sitting upright.
Using algorithms adapted from face-recognition technology, the computer then compares those calculations with a library of similar data on prerecorded, averaged profiles for specific postures, such as leaning left, right-leg crossed, and slouching.
"Multiculturalism and ethnicity were already slouching toward New Have n" (66).
5, Bush said, "Too often, on social issues, my party has painted an image of America slouching tomorrow Gomorrah."
His posture is not good either, his back is curved and he is slouching. He is plainly exhausted."