slope

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Related to slopes: Slope intercept form

slippery slope

A situation in which some behavior or action will eventually lead to a worse form of the same behavior or action, or a disastrous outcome. Eating that piece of cake is a slippery slope that could lead to you completely abandoning your diet. Verbal abuse is often a slippery slope that leads to physical abuse.
See also: slippery, slope

on a slippery slope

In a situation in which some behavior or action will eventually lead to a worse form of the same behavior or action. We've been on a slippery slope of borrowing more money to pay off the debts we already owe. Activists fear that this latest legislation will put us on a slippery slope to stifling free speech.
See also: on, slippery, slope

slope away from (something)

1. To recede from something at a downward angle. Our driveway slopes away from the house, so you've got to be careful to always have your handbrake on when you park your car out front. Tell the landscapers to make sure that the grass slopes away from the center of the field. That way, rainwater will naturally drain off into the gutters and we won't be left with big muddy patches.
2. To cause or construct something to recede from something at a downward angle. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "slope" and "down." I want to slope the floor of the stables away from the horses' stalls so water won't collect beneath them when we bathe them. The builder obviously wasn't paying attention, because he ended up sloping the bookshelf away from the wall.
See also: away, slope

slope down

1. To slant toward or recede from something at a downward angle. The field slopes down from the mansion at the top, forming something of shallow basin below. The driveway slopes down to the main road at a sharp angle, so you've got to be careful to always have your handbrake on when you park your car out there.
2. To cause or construct something to slant toward or recede from something at a downward angle. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "slope" and "down." Tell the landscapers to slope the grass down to the road to help rainwater naturally drain off into the gutters. Whoever built this bookshelf obviously wasn't paying attention, because they sloped all the shelves slope down from the back of it, so things keep rolling off and breaking on the ground!
See also: down, slope

slope toward (something)

1. To slant in the direction of something at a downward angle. If your driveway slopes toward the front of your house, you could face major flooding issues if you don't have a drainage solution in place. The cabin is stunning, with a front lawn that slopes right down toward the lake.
2. To cause or construct something to slant in the direction of something else at a downward angle. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "slope" and "toward." I want the landscapers to slope the field toward the river so rainwater will be naturally drained away. I made sure the floor of the workshop was made of concrete and sloped it toward the door to make cleaning as easy as possible.
See also: slope, toward

slope up

1. To slant at an upward angle (to or toward something). It hasn't been too bad cycling to work for the most part, but the road slopes up near the end and I always end up drenched in sweat by the time I get to the office. We've got to make sure the sidewalk slopes up to the entrance of the building so people with mobility issues won't have any problems getting in. The field slopes up toward the base of the mountains, like a gentle invitation to a greater challenge.
2. To cause or construct something to have an upward slant (to or toward something). In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "slope" and "up." Whenever I'm building shelves, I always try to slope them up a tiny bit to help keep things from rolling off. I want to slope the driveway right up to our front door.
See also: slope, up

slippery slope

a dangerous pathway or route to follow; a route that leads to trouble. The matter of euthanasia is a slippery slope with both legal and moral considerations.
See also: slippery, slope

slope away from something

to slant downward and away from something. The lawn sloped away from the patio toward the riverbank. The porch sloped away from the house at a very slight angle.
See also: away, slope

slope down (to something or some place)

to slant downward toward something or some place from a higher level. The wide white beach sloped down to the azure water. The yard sloped down, making a lovely view from the living room.
See also: down, slope

slope (down) toward something

to slant downward toward something. The backyard slopes down toward the river. It slopes toward the water.
See also: slope, toward

slope up (to something)

to slant upward in the direction of something. The ramp sloped up to the door, allowing wheelchairs to enter. It sloped up rather steeply.
See also: slope, up

slippery slope

A dangerous course, one that leads easily to catastrophe, as in He's on a slippery slope, compromising his values to please both the bosses and the union . This metaphoric expression alludes to traversing a slick hillside, in constant danger of falling. [Mid-1900s]
See also: slippery, slope

a slippery slope

COMMON A slippery slope is a course of action which is likely to lead to failure or serious trouble. It's a slippery slope. You give in to one demand and soon find that you're doing exactly what they want. The company started down the slippery slope of believing that they knew better than the customer, with the inevitable disastrous results. Note: You can also say that someone is on a slippery slope or on the slippery slope. These young people may already be on the slippery slope to criminality.
See also: slippery, slope

slippery slope

an idea or course of action which will lead inevitably to something unacceptable, wrong, or disastrous.
1998 Spectator Those of us who feared that devolution would not assuage nationalist sentiment but turn out to be the slippery slope to separatism have a good chance of being proved right.
See also: slippery, slope

the slippery ˈslope

a situation or way of behaving that could quickly lead to danger, disaster, failure, etc: Starting with shoplifting, he was soon on the slippery slope towards a life of crime.
See also: slippery, slope

slippery slope, a

A dangerous path or situation leading to disaster. Alluding to a path down which one could slide to a bad fall, this figure of speech dates from the mid-1900s. The Daily Telegraph of January 6, 1964 stated, “While Western feet thus approach what some fear may be a slippery slope towards recognition of the East, Ulbricht’s ground seems as firm as ever it was.” In a New Yorker piece about writers chronicling Sherlock Holmes, one of them is quoted as saying, “I’ve now done . . . more than fifteen hundred pages and I’ve only gotten up to 1950. It’s been a slippery slope into madness and obsession” (Dec. 13, 2004).
See also: slippery
References in periodicals archive ?
The aim of this research is to lay a foundation for the stability evaluation of the saturated and unsaturated soil slopes using permanent displacement.
Ez Eldin, "Stability analysis of stratified rock slopes with spatially variable strength parameters: the case of Qianjiangping landslide," Bulletin of Engineering Geology and the Environment, vol.
Both failed and stable slopes were subjected to the same volume of overflow from the congested interceptor drain, it is possible that the overflow was enough to increase the water content of the failed slope to its liquid limit, saturating and destabilizing it but it was not enough to destabilize the stable slope due to its capability of retaining more water.
Based on upper-bound solution, Michalowski and Drescher [19] proposed a class of three-dimensional rotational failure mechanism for the static stability of homogeneous slopes. This failure mechanism was further adopted for analyzing the static stability of slopes with reinforcement (Gao et al.
Ye, Modified limiting equilibrium method for stability analysis of stratified rock slopes, Mathematical Problems in Engineering, Volume 2016, ID 8381021, 9 pages, doi: 10.1155/2016/8381021.
'It bears reiteration that this latest incident exposes the dangers of development on slopes, especially when cut, and regardless whether legal or illegal,' they said.
Jasna received the award in the size under 60 kilometres of ski slopes categories, earning four of five possible stars, stated Juraj Chovaak, the marketing manager of Tatry Mountain Resorts.
Gordon added: "Ultimately, if you spend time practising before you get to the real snow slopes, this saves time on relearning the basics in a resort and allows for a more enjoyable holiday or trip to the mountains."
Potential of material to move downward increases due to steep slope which indicates that the steep slopes are more susceptible to erosion (Yohannes, et al., 2015).
After the generation of the digital elevation models (DEM) areas in different slopes, the second step of the GIS analysis was conducted.
According to related research [27,28], the landslide history of the two types of slopes can be divided according to the slip speed.
The successful experience of stabilization of unstable slopes at Bansara Gali by simple augmentation of drainage measures has open vistas for adopting such simple measures in similar conditions in the mountainous areas.
That's because the official planning application for Huddersfield's first snowsports slope has been submitted.
KFAR DEBIAN, Lebanon: If one of your New Year's resolutions is to get in shape, head to the hills for some skiing or snowboarding at the Mzaar Kfar Debian ski resort, which has just opened nine of their slopes this weekend.
For steep slopes, these lengths should be converted to horizontal distance for use in RUSLE (McCool et al.