slip

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Related to slipping: Slipping Away

slip up

1. To blunder; to make a mistake or an error. I think I slipped up and sent the check to the wrong address. Wow, it looks like the accountants must have really slipped up this time.
2. To interfere with someone or their ability to do something; to cause someone to make a mistake or an error. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between or after "slip" and "up." I have to concentrate while I do this, so please don't talk and screw me up! She always uses intimidation tactics to try and slip up her opponents.
3. noun A minor mistake, blunder, or mishandling. In this usage, the phrase is usually hyphenated. He's had one too many slip-ups in the office, so we may have to let him go. He was overcharged due to a slip-up by the IRS.
See also: slip, up

slip

verb
See:
References in periodicals archive ?
Guy Pearce plays the musician with whom Lili Taylor is obsessed in ``A Slipping Down Life.
The researchers' data show that the two are linked--the longer the period after a particular slipping event, the larger the subsequent event is likely to be.
When firefighters arrived, they placed a rope around Paul's body to prevent him from slipping any farther.
Rising costs associated with customers slipping and falling in supermarkets has been one of the biggest concerns facing the retail food industry, but a new system from the Gleason Food Group, a division of the Gleason Agency, promises to change that.
Given the genesis of the art of slipping, should we still be expected to master it?
As you're slipping, then, remain conscious of when you are at or near maximum rudder travel.
In some aircraft, possible interruption of power can occur due to unporting of the fuel intake ports and in others control problems could occur when slipping with full flaps.
Researchers have found that the North American and Pacific plates are slipping past one another at a rate that is much faster than the movement of the San Andreas fault (SN: 12/21 & 28/85, p.
Instead of sticking and then slipping as they had done before the last great earthquakes, the two blocks are now sliding continuously and stably, in a process alled aseismic subduction.