slip off

(redirected from slip off to)

slip off

1. To escape or depart for some location quietly or in secret. Sometimes followed by "to (some place)." I felt really uncomfortable in the group of strangers, so I slipped off when everyone was distracted. We decided to skip the meeting and slipped off to the movies instead.
2. To quickly, easily, or delicately remove an article of clothing. (In this form, a noun can be used between "slip" and "off.") She slipped her shoes and jacket off and made her way noiselessly up the stairs.
See also: off, slip

slip something off

to let an item of clothing slide off one's body; to remove an item of clothing easily or casually. He slipped his coat off and put it on a chair. she slipped off her shoes and relaxed.
See also: off, slip

slip off (to some place)

to sneak away to some place. Judy and Jeff slipped off to the movies unnoticed. They slipped off and no one saw them leave.
See also: off, slip

slip off

((of) someone or something) to fall away from or off someone or something. (Of is usually retained before pronouns.) The jacket slipped off of Sally, but she grabbed it before it hit the floor. she hung the jacket on the back of the chair, but it slipped off.
See also: off, slip

slip off

v.
To remove some article of clothing quickly or easily: They slipped off their shoes. I reached for my ring and slipped it off.
See also: off, slip
References in periodicals archive ?
I'd party with John Cale and Thurston Moore (my new best mates) then quietly slip off to suburbia to give Elvis and Amelie Bowie (the kids) a quick kiss before bed.
NSPCC policy adviser Dr Zoe Hilton said: "I would hope the authorities would make sure he does not slip off to another country.
Marillier blends a variety of fantasy elements into her story: the sisters who slip off to dance in the fairy kingdom, the enchanted frog, and the legends of the bloodthirsty vampires of the region.
He tells us: "Life hasn't changed that much - I can still slip off to the boozer when I want to.
Less doting is Leontine's husband, Monsieur Duchotel (Caulfield), whose frequent ``hunting trips'' are actually ruses allowing him to slip off to Paris to see a mistress.
If you're intrigued by the sights overhead, slip off to the lobby, where a high-powered telescope is aimed heavenward.