slice off


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slice off

To cut something or some portion off of some larger thing or piece, with or as with a blade. A noun or pronoun can be used between "slice" and "off." Debris from the crash sliced his hand off. Slice off a piece for me, will you? We'll have to slice off any branches showing signs of rot.
See also: off, slice

slice something off

to cut something off with slicing motions. Sue sliced the dead branches off with a tree saw. Karen sliced off a nice piece of turkey.
See also: off, slice

slice off

v.
To cut something from a larger piece: I picked up the knife and sliced off a piece of cheese. The chef held the pineapple down and sliced the top off.
See also: off, slice
References in periodicals archive ?
Once you have taken the first slice off you repeat the process all the way round and if you use the line where the white skin (pith) meets the orange fruit then this is a perfect guide.
Method: Slice off rounded end off each tomato and reserve.
Also great for cutting between paving stones/patios/paths and your lawn, it will just slice off any overhang weeds or growth in seconds leaving the perfect finish.
VILLAGERS are to slice off the top of a mountain so they can get sunlight.
Use a sharp spade to slice off a section of root with a sucker attached and transplant it immediately.
She said: "One man instructed the other man to gouge out my eyes and slice off my ears.
To harvest (the first edible leaves should appear in about six weeks), slice off the outer leaves as shown above.
SCOTS comic Billy Connolly - rapped for his sick joke about beheaded British hostage Ken Bigley - will slice off a fellow zombie's head with a shovel in his next movie.
Which brings us, speaking of separation, to Thomas Beyermann, a German who chased his estranged wife down the street and stabbed her to death with the knife she'd just used to slice off his penis.
JAMES has hit the nail on the head, pointing out that Mersey Docks and Harbour Company wants to have its cake and eat it by taking a slice off the Pier Head (Letters, May 28).