sleepwalk


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sleepwalk

n. a movement toward something without effort; easy advancement; an easy task. (see also cakewalk, walk.) Getting the degree was a sleepwalk. Getting a job was hell.
References in periodicals archive ?
RULE No 2: If you know you sleepwalk, it's best not to sleep in the buff
No one had realised that Nathan, who still sleepwalks, wasn't awake and a search was scrambled when he disappeared.
Liberal Democrat defence spokesman Paul Keetch said: "We must not sleepwalk into conflict.
It's like a form of sleepwalking, only you don't sleepwalk, you have sex," she said.
Mark Phillips, 42, from Ingleby Barwick, called evidence from two sleepwalk experts in his defence against a charge of sexual assault.
Thomas's mum said he had a history of sleepwalking but an ex-girlfriend told the court she had never known him to sleepwalk and had never woken to find him having sex with her.
It's been truly depressing to watch someone as potentially inventive as Murphy sleepwalk through dreary, unimaginative films - if his work had been as lazy and desultory in his first films as it has been lately, he wouldn't be making movies at all today.
Celebrity chef Antony Worrall Thompson used to sleepwalk when young: "It started when my mother sent me to boarding school so she could further her career as an actress.
Bullock and Grant could sleepwalk through these roles, but they don't, which is the main reason the film succeeds at all.
For children who frequently sleepwalk, `prompted awakenings' may help.
A MAN known to sleepwalk died after climbing out of a hotel window in the night and falling 13ft on to the roof of an empty room below.
Boys sleepwalk more frequently than girls and most cases are reported between the ages of 11 and 12.