slash at

slash (out) at someone

to thrust out at someone with a knife or something similar, with the intent of cutting. The attacker slashed out at his victim and then ran away. Max slashed at the cop with a pocketknife.
See also: slash
References in classic literature ?
Here the lecture began, but Jo heard very little of it, for while Professor Sands was prosing away about Belzoni, Cheops, scarabei, and hieroglyphics, she was covertly taking down the address of the paper, and boldly resolving to try for the hundred-dollar prize offered in its columns for a sensational story.
One can imagine them, covered with sand, excited and disordered, running up the little street in the bright sunlight just as the shop folks were taking down their shutters and people were opening their bedroom windows.
Taking down the bottle of "Cleverness" she added some of the powder to the heap on the dish.
A sailor was taking down the life-line that stretched from the forecastle, past the hatches and cargo-winches, to the bridge-deck ladder.
There's a bloke here behind taking down every blessed word you're saying.
Trabb, taking down a roll of cloth, and tiding it out in a flowing manner over the counter, preparatory to getting his hand under it to show the gloss, "is a very sweet article.
Singles with a strong disposition and a sense of humor can send their questions to Uncle Slash at www.
When she tried to get him off me, he tried to slash at her too.
severing vertebrae or hitting the carotid arteries) than it would be to slash at the chest because the ribs provide a great deal of protection to the heart and lungs.