slant

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a new slant

A unique angle, approach, or perspective toward something. It is taken from sailing terminology, in which "a new slant" is applied to the boat to achieve the its optimum angle of heel. This band is great, they really bring a new slant to the heavy metal scene. We want to hire an executive who will bring a new slant to the direction of the company.
See also: new, slant

slant against (someone or something)

1. To lean against or angle into something. He slanted against the doorframe with his eyes narrowed and his arms crossed while I packed my things into a suitcase. The fence has gotten so weighed down with ivy that it has started slanting against the side of the house.
2. To hold, represent, or play into a bias against someone or something. While the newspaper typically slants against the politician, it has come out in favor of her new tax reform proposal. The group has always slanted against any form of governmental control or interference, promoting deregulation and state-level autonomy instead.
3. To write or present something in such a way as to form, represent, or play into a bias against someone or something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "slant" and "against." Please try to keep your writing neutral—we don't want you slanting your articles against any politicians or political parties. Purporting itself to simply be presenting facts, it's pretty clear the director has slanted the documentary against the criminal justice system.
See also: slant

slant toward (someone or something)

1. To lean, tilt, or incline in the direction of someone or something. His eyelids began to droop as he started slanting toward me in his chair. Is it just me, or is the north wall slanting slightly toward the road?
2. To hold, represent, or play into a bias in favor or support of someone or something. While the newspaper typically slants toward more conservative viewpoints, it has come out in favor of the governor's plan to increase taxes The group has always slanted toward federal deregulation and the autonomy of citizens, being very vocal in its opposition of governmental control or interference.
3. To write or present something in such a way as to form, represent, or play into a bias in favor or support of someone or something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "slant" and "toward." Please try to keep your writing neutral—we don't want you slanting your articles toward any politicians or political parties. Purporting itself to simply be presenting facts, it's pretty clear the director has slanted the documentary toward the convicts who claim they were framed by the state.
See also: slant, toward

slant against something

to rest obliquely against something. The bookcase slants against the wall, and it should be straight. The lumber was left slanted against the garage.
See also: slant

slant something against someone or something

to bias something against someone or something; to twist information so it is against someone or something. The writer slanted the story against the innocent people of the town. The reporter slanted her story against one political party.
See also: slant

slant something toward someone or something

 and slant something in favor of someone or something
to bias something toward someone or something; to twist information so it favors someone or something. The writer slanted the story toward the plaintiff's charges. The reporter slanted her story in favor of one political party.
See also: slant, toward

slant toward someone or something

to incline toward someone or something. The scenery slanted toward the actors and looked as if it would fall. Everything in your sketch slants toward the right.
See also: slant, toward

slant

n. a biased view; a unique perception. (A synonym for angle.) You can probably give us yet another slant on this problem.
References in periodicals archive ?
A good deal of Slanted is skimmable (if not skippable).
"The Slants case is really a recognition of a business owner's right to exercise his or her free speech, to make decisions about their marks, and that just because you put a mark on a national register, which is what happens when you apply for trademark registration, it doesn't all of a sudden become government speech," says McConkie.
After their Eugene concert, The Slants head south for shows in California before heading east, ending their tour in Brooklyn.
The Slants' legal battle endeared them to Jim Caruso, the fast-talking CEO of Flying Dog.
May 1, 2009 to July 31, 2009 has explored many interesting results and facts about the slants and frames used by the newspapers.
Left: This slant, like the Right call, is predetermined.
This is the croise that Balanchine used most often in choreography and that we practiced most frequently in class: body straight, working leg directly front or back, neck curved, head slanted, upstage arm in a fifth high framing the face (meaning the hand is just in front of the head, rather than pulled to the back) so the fingertips are over the center line of the head.
The court's reasoning, however, is likely to protect both The Slants' and the Redskins' right to trademark their names.
LJ slant with Rifampicin (40ug/ml) - 250 slants,LJ medium with ethambutol (2 ug/ml) - 250 slants,LJ medium medium with streptomycin (4 ug/ml) - 250 slants,LJ medium slant - 250 slants
2075, growth first appeared after 2 weeks on LJ slants with and without pyruvate.
Billing themselves at "the world's first and only all-Asian-American dance rock band," Portland's the Slants play 1980s-driven synth-pop with hard-hitting beats.
The most recent album from the Slants is a remix called "Slants!
"Sakura Sakura," the first track on the Slants' debut CD, "Slanted Eyes, Slanted Hearts," is perhaps the most heavy-handed in dealing with racial issues.
The use of slants, shifts, and shift to slant deceive the offense and make it difficult for them to block well consistently.
7 shows that when our noseguard slants away from the Trap, our playside tackle is slanting into it.