slam


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Related to slam: Slam Poetry

grand slam

1. In the card game bridge, the winning of all thirteen tricks on one deal of the game. I've been playing bridge for years, but I've still never been able to make a grand slam.
2. In baseball, a homerun that is achieved when all three bases have runners on them. It looked like the home team was in for a sure loss, but a grand slam at the last minute edged them ahead of their opponents.
3. (sometimes capitalized) In sports, the winning of all major championships or tournaments in a single year, especially in tennis or golf. The young player shocked the tennis world by winning a Grand Slam in her first year at the professional level.
4. By extension, any total, sweeping victory or success. With the Ohio votes in her favor, it looks like the new president has managed a grand slam.
See also: grand, slam

be a slam dunk

To be predicted or expected to be successful; to be something that achieves success or a certain goal easily. All the best players in school are on our team—victory will be a slam dunk! I thought it would be a slam dunk to pass, but the bill didn't even make it out of committee.
See also: dunk, slam

slam (on) the brake(s)

1. Literally, to quickly press on a vehicle's brakes to slow down or stop. He slammed on the brakes when he saw the child running into the street. You risk doing your car serious damage if you slam the brake without shifting down the gears.
2. By extension, to slow down or stop something that one is doing. We had to slam on the brakes when we found out investors were pulling out of the company.
See also: slam

slam the brake(s) on

1. Literally, to quickly press on a vehicle's brakes to slow down or stop. He slammed the brakes on when he saw the child running into the street. You risk doing your car serious damage if you slam the brake on without shifting down the gears.
2. By extension, to slow down or stop something one is doing. In this usage, the thing being stopped can be stated after "on." We had to slam the brakes on development when we found out the investors were pulling out.
See also: on, slam

slam back

To eat or drink something very hastily or voraciously. A noun or pronoun can be used between "slam" and "back." Don't just slam your food back like that—take a moment to actually enjoy what you're eating! I slammed back the burger so I could get back on the road straight away. It's no wonder you have such a bad hangover from the way you were slamming drinks back last night.
See also: back, slam

slam down

To eat or drink something very hastily or voraciously. A noun or pronoun can be used between "slam" and "down." Don't just slam your food down like that—take a moment to actually enjoy what you're eating! I slammed down the burger so I could get back on the road straight away. It's no wonder you have such a bad hangover from the way you were slamming drinks down last night.
See also: down, slam

slam dunk

1. noun Literally, a goal scored in basketball by putting the ball straight down into the hoop with one's hand. The move isn't worth more points than a traditional basket, but it is a show of force, dominance, and skill. Because of his incredible height, Sam racked up more slam dunks than any other player in the league.
2. noun By extension, a forceful, dramatic success or accomplishment, especially one that is completed handily or easily. This conviction was a slam dunk for the district attorney's office. Their latest smartphone is yet another slam dunk for the electronics manufacturer.
3. verb Literally, to score a slam dunk in basketball. Sometimes hyphenated. You need to stop trying to slam dunk every time you're near the net. She's been slam-dunking against the other team all evening.
4. verb By extension, to achieve a forceful, dramatic success or accomplishment handily or easily, often at the expense of someone or something else. Sometimes hyphenated. The incumbent president has slam dunked his opponent in every televised debate so far. If we can slam-dunk this proposal, we'll get enough funding to see us through to the end of next year.
See also: dunk, slam

slam into (someone or something)

To collide with someone or something in a very forceful or violent manner. Another driver ignored a red light and slammed into us in the middle of the intersection. He didn't see the dining room table and slammed right into it.
See also: slam

pound a beer

To drink a glass, can, or bottle of beer very quickly. Usually used in plural constructions. I'd rather just hang out at home and pound some beers while I watch the game. He can pound a few beers and not feel a thing.
See also: beer, pound

slam a beer

To drink a glass, can, or bottle of beer very quickly. Usually used in plural constructions. I'd rather just hang out at home and slam some beers while I watch the game. He can slam a few beers and not feel a thing.
See also: beer, slam

slam beer

To drink a lot of beer, especially very quickly. We were slamming beer all night, and now I feel bloated and hung over. I know you were looking forward to slamming some beer with your friends, but I really need to you to stay sober tonight.
See also: beer, slam

slam (someone or something)

1. To criticize every aspect of someone or something very harshly. The professor slammed my paper, calling it a total a waste of paper. The boss exploded at the meeting, slamming everyone involved with the ill-fated project.
2. To eat or, more commonly, drink something very quickly, especially in large volumes. He sat at the bar slamming beers and shots of tequila so fast that I thought we'd have to carry him home. She's a professional speed eater—she literally makes a living out of slamming hot dogs and chicken wings.
See also: slam

slam the door in (one's) face

1. Literally, to close a door (e.g., to a house or room) forcefully when one is about to enter or is standing in the doorway. I was so mad at Paul for the way he spoke to me earlier that I slammed the door right in his face when he came back to the apartment last night.
2. By extension, to withdraw support from or refuse to engage, communicate, or work with one in a very abrupt and discourteous manner. This economy is so bad right now. Every business in town slammed the door in my face when I asked about getting a job. The company slammed the door in the CEO's face after rumors of his alleged embezzlement began to circulate. The senator slammed the door in the reporter's face when she tried to interview him about the scandal.
See also: door, face, slam

slam-bang

1. adjective, slang Very exciting and vigorous, especially due to great action and speed. The film's slam-bang finale makes up for the slow start and ho-hum middle. The show turned out to be more thoughtful and introspective than slam-bang, which I think took a lot of viewers by surprise.
2. adverb, slang In a very exciting, vigorous, and action-packed manner. The play unfolds slam-bang from beginning to end, and the audience is left breathless by the end of it. The two boxers have been going at it slam-bang for the last three rounds, each one determined to knock the other out.
3. adverb, slang Very quickly, frenetically, and carelessly. The team went slam-bang for the first half of the game, but was left totally depleted as a result in the second half.
4. adverb, slang Very forcefully and noisily. The truck crashed slam-bang through the wall, bringing everyone in the area to a total standstill.

slamming

1. slang Really exciting, interesting, or enjoyable; awesome. Often spelled "slammin'." The band just released a slamming new album. I can't stop listening to it! That was a pretty slammin' concert on Saturday. It was like one giant party!
2. slang Very sexually attractive. Often spelled "slammin'." I cannot believe how many slammin' girls are in my econ class.
See also: slam

slam dunk

 
1. Lit. [in basketball] a goal scored by shooting the ball down from above the rim. He was wide open and scored on an easy slam dunk.
2. Fig. an action or accomplishment that is easily done. Finishing that project with all his experience should be a slam dunk for George.
See also: dunk, slam

slam into someone or something

to crash into someone or something. The race carout of controlslammed into the stands. The bus slammed into a truck.
See also: slam

slam someone or something down

to drive or strike someone or something downward. The wrestler slammed his opponent down hard. He slammed down his opponent and injured him.
See also: down, slam

slam something down (on something)

 and slam something down (onto something)
to bang something down onto something. She slammed her fist down on the table in anger. Karen slammed down her fist onto the table.
See also: down, slam

slam the brakes on

to push on a vehicle's brakes suddenly and hard. (The can be replaced by a possessive pronoun.) The driver in front of me slammed her brakes on and I nearly ran into her. Don't slam on your brakes when the road is wet.
See also: brake, on, slam

slam the door in someone's face

 
1. Lit. to swing a door closed with force while someone is standing in the doorway. I didn't know Todd was behind me and I accidentally slammed the door in his face. Please don't slam the door in my face!
2. Fig. suddenly to withdraw an opportunity from someone. The events of the last week effectively slammed the door in my face for future employment. We slammed the door in Bill's face since he was so rude when we interviewed him.
See also: door, face, slam

grand slam

A sweeping success or total victory, as in This presentation gave us a grand slam-every buyer placed an order. This term originated in the early 1800s in the card game of whist (forerunner of contract bridge), where it refers to the taking of all thirteen tricks. It later was extended to bridge and various sports, where it has different meanings: in baseball, a home run hit with runners on all the bases, resulting in four runs for the team; in tennis, winning all four national championships in a single calendar year; in golf, winning all four major championships. In the 1990s the term was used for four related proposals presented on a ballot at once.
See also: grand, slam

slam dunk

A forceful, dramatic move, as in That indictment was a slam dunk if ever there was one. This expression is also often put as a verb, slam-dunk, meaning "make a forceful move against someone," as in This is a great chance for us to slam-dunk the opposition. The idiom comes from basketball, where it refers to a dramatic shot in which the ball is thrust into the basket from above the rim. It was transferred to other activities from about 1980 on.
See also: dunk, slam

be a ˈslam dunk

(American English) be something that is certain to be successful: The case looked like a slam dunk for the prosecution.
In basketball, a slam dunk is the act of jumping up and putting the ball through the net with a lot of force.
See also: dunk, slam

slam down

v.
To put something down forcefully so as to produce a loud noise: I got angry and slammed down the phone. The teacher slammed a book down to get the students' attention.
See also: down, slam

slam into

v.
To hit something with force; crash into someone or something: The truck lost its brakes and slammed into the guardrail.
See also: slam

pound a beer

and pound some beers and hammer a beer and hammer some beers and slam a beer and slam some beers
tv. to drink a beer; to drink a beer fast. Let’s go down to the tavern and pound some beers.
See also: beer, pound

slam a beer

verb
See also: beer, slam

slam some beers

verb
See also: beer, slam

slam

1. tv. to criticize someone or something. The secretary was slamming the boss in one room, and the boss was slamming the secretary in another.
2. n. a criticism. Harry took another slam at the sales record the sales force had produced for the meeting.
3. tv. to drink something quickly. Bart slammed a couple of beers and left.

slam dunk

1. tv. & in. to force a basketball into the basket from above. (see also jam.) Wilbur slam dunked another one, raising the score from 108 to 110.
2. n. an act of making a basket as in sense 1 Another slam dunk and Wilbur ties the score again!
See also: dunk, slam

slam-bang

mod. wild; exciting. It was a slam-bang weekend, and I loved every minute of it.

slamming

mod. great. We had one slamming time last night.
See also: slam

slam dunk

A very forceful move. This term comes from basketball, where it denotes a strong and often dramatic shot in which the player leaps up and thrusts the ball into the basket from above. Both term and technique date from the 1960s, and by the 1980s the term was being used in business, politics, and other areas, both as a noun and as a verb (to slam dunk). The Boston Globe has used it in both forms: “‘I fear they assume this election will be a slam dunk,’ Rollins said” (July 24, 1991), and “I found that very energizing. . . . There was a real opportunity to slam dunk that one” (May 5, 1992). It is well on its way to cliché status.
See also: dunk, slam
References in periodicals archive ?
Djokovic, 31, will lift a record seventh Norman Brookes Trophy with a win while Nadal, 32, will become the first man in the Open Era to win all four Grand Slams twice if he adds to his 2009 Melbourne Park crown.
"Of course he can," Del Potro (https://www.ibtimes.com/novak-djokovic-backed-surpass-roger-federer-rafael-nadals-grand-slam-tally-2715351) said after the US Open final when asked if Djokovic could break the Grand Slam record .
'There is a lot of significance of me being now shoulder to shoulder in terms of Grand Slam wins with him.
With regards to Taiwanese players who have obtained memberships of Grand Slam venues, Chan Yung-jen is second only to Hsieh with three except for Wimbledon.
IMZ: In short, what is slam or slam poetry, and what are some of the promises and problems within slam and spoken word?
Slam's 1,376-hectare satellite property comprises two mineral claims adjacent to and west of Trevali's Heath Steele Mineproperty.
In an exclusive chat with India Today after his win in Paris, Leander said, " This is the one grand slam that was missing from my showcase and to complete it after so many years after the men's career grand slam has made it a full career." But that's not all.
The demands of the modern game, experts said, make the Grand Slam almost impossible but suddenly, in the era of Novak, it seems possible once more.
Angelique Kerber yesterday became the first German to win the Australian Open since Steffi Graf in 1994 when she upset 7-2 ante-post favourite Serena Williams 6-4 3-6 6-4 at Melbourne Park to join the ranks of Grand Slam champions.
The 21-time major champion again holds all four grand slam gongs at the same time, some 12 years after first completing that feat and christening it the "Serena Slam".
achieving the "Tiger Slam" of 2000 US Open, Open and US PGA and 2001 Masters.
Whiley became the first British wheelchair tennis player to complete a calendar year slam of Grand Slams in September when she and Kamiji added the US Open doubles title to their Australian Open, Roland Garros and Wimbledon titles.
Glenelg, Australia, July 14, 2014 --(PR.com)-- SLAM Strategy released a case study comparing the results of an Adwords campaign between themselves and one of Australia's largest Adwords providers.
London, Jan 27 ( ANI ): Switzerland's Stanislas Wawrinka, who becomes the first player ever to beat Novak Djokovic and Rafa Nadal and lift the Australian Open, has admitted that he never dreamed of winning a Grand Slam, as he was never considered good enough to beat those guys.
New York: Serena Williams has taken her tennis career to another level by winning four of the past six Grand Slam titles since teaming up with French coach Patrick Mouratoglou.