skim


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skim the surface (of something)

To do, engage with, or understand something to only a minimal or superficial degree. I know you feel like you know everything about philosophy now, but this introductory course only skims the surface. Jack never felt satisfied devoting his time and attention to one thing, so instead he's skimmed the surface of a number of hobbies and interests.
See also: skim, surface

skim off

1. Literally, to scoop or scrape something off the surface of something, especially a liquid. A noun or pronoun can be used between "skim" and "off." Be sure to skim off the fatty foam as your stew cooks. Please use the net to skim leaves and other debris off the surface of the pool each morning.
2. By extension, to take funds, especially illegally or deceitfully, from another source in small increments. A noun or pronoun can be used between "skim" and "off." The CEO has been accused of skimming money off from his employees' pensions funds to pay for his personal trips around the world. The sales assistant skimmed off money from the till for years before she was finally caught.
See also: off, skim

skim over (something)

1. Literally, to glide or skip over or across the very top of some surface or thing. The stone skimmed over the surface of the pond. The ball skimmed over the catcher's mitt, allowing the batter to get to first base.
2. To read, review, or present something quickly or superficially, typically by only reading or covering certain parts of it. I only had time to skim over your report, but I like what I've seen so far. He skimmed over the problems the project had faced, focusing instead on the progress they had made.
See also: over, skim

skim through (something)

To read, review, or present something quickly or superficially, typically by only reading or covering certain parts of it. I only had time to skim through your report, but I like what I've seen so far. He skimmed through the problems the project had faced, focusing instead on the progress they had made.
See also: skim, through

skim over something

 
1. Lit. to glide across something. The sailboat skimmed over the waves like a bird. The bird skimmed over the treetops, darting and dodging.
2. Fig. to go over or review something hastily. I just skimmed over the material and still got an A on the test! Please skim over chapter four for Thursday.
See also: over, skim

skim something off (of) something

 and skim something off 
1. Lit. to scoop something off the surface of something. (Of is usually retained before pronouns.) The cook skimmed the fat off the stew. The cook skimmed off the fat.
2. Fig. to remove a portion of something of value, such as money, from an account. (Of is usually retained before pronouns.) The auditor was skimming a few dollars a day off the bank's cash flow. Kelly skimmed off a few dollars each day.
See also: off, skim

skim through something

to go through something hastily; to read through something hastily. She skimmed through the catalogs, looking for a nice gift for Gary. I will skim through your manuscript and see whether it looks promising.
See also: skim, through

skim off

v.
1. To remove some floating matter from a liquid: They use a net to skim the cranberries off the surface. They skim off the dross before pouring the metal into molds.
2. To appropriate some money illegally or dishonestly: The dictator skimmed off over $1 million from international donations and deposited it in personal bank accounts. The company was skimming money off its employees' paychecks and using it to cover losses.
See also: off, skim

skim over

v.
To read or consider something superficially and quickly: I skimmed over the reading assignment because I didn't have time to read it carefully.
See also: over, skim

skim through

v.
To go through some reading material quickly or superficially: I skimmed through the movie listings to see what was playing.
See also: skim, through
References in periodicals archive ?
Nevertheless, high precision parts still require skim cuts.
"I think (skim) probably is going to grow at a faster rate because of the labeling changes we've been granted," Dryer says.
Skim's use of AI in web mining gives customers a unique advantage by providing a broad ability to extract content from websites of different page types, whilst still remaining as accurate as a traditional point and click rule based approach.
Scientists at North Carolina State University investigated the impact of production run time on the sensory, microbiological and functional properties of skim milk powder.
Business owners typically skim cash revenues to avoid payment of income taxes.
Never, ever snort at another bloke's skim - even if it hits the water and sinks like a hammer.
The Obihiro Public Health Center officials said Snow Brand produced about 900 bags of powdered skim milk at its Taiki plant in southern Hokkaido, 70 more than the 830 bags it reported.
Success of such products as Skim Deluxe, marketed by Kroger Co., shows an interest in skim milk that looks and tastes more like 2 percent, says Alan Levitt, senior analyst with the Jerry Dryer Group, a dairy consulting firm.
To skim, these insects flap their wings as if to fly, but they never lift off.
But these dinosaurs are being elbowed aside by a new generation of cheeses that use skim milk and gums to slash the fat--in some cases down to zero.
On a winter day it's hard to resist a cup of cocoa--and if made with skim milk, it can be low in fat as well as nutritious.
'Highly organised criminals bribe or threaten people working in petrol stations, restaurants and shops to skim customer cards for them.
Added skim milk cuts the fat in half (to 5 grams per ounce).
Researchers in New Zealand have shown that the antibody-rich skim milk from cows vaccinated against particular strains of 16 species of human-gut bacteria lowers cholesterol more than skim milk with equivalent calcium from nonimmunized cows.