sit on the fence

sit on the fence

(about something) Go to on the fence (about something).
See also: fence, on, sit

sit on the fence

Fig. not to take sides in a dispute; not to make a clear choice between two possibilities. (Fig. on the image of someone straddling a fence, representing indecision.) When Jane and Tom argue, it is best to sit on the fence and not make either of them angry. No one knows which of the candidates Joan will vote for. She's sitting on the fence.
See also: fence, on, sit

sit on the fence

COMMON If you sit on the fence, you refuse to give a definite opinion about something or to say who you support in an argument. Who was cooler, Starsky or Hutch? You couldn't sit on the fence and say you liked both of them equally. Note: Verbs such as stay and be can be used instead of sit. Democrats who'd been on the fence about the nomination, in the end all voted for him. Note: You can call this kind of behaviour fence-sitting, and someone who behaves like this a fence-sitter. At his first press conference there was much fence-sitting. I sense that there are a lot of fence-sitters out there on this issue. Note: These expressions are usually used to show that you disapprove of the fact that someone is not making a decision. Note: The fence referred to is one that separates two properties or territories and someone sitting on it is unable or unwilling to make a decision about which side to stand on.
See also: fence, on, sit