sing of (someone or something)

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sing of (someone or something)

To tell a story about something or give praise to someone, especially in verse. The poet sings of an epic battle waged centuries ago. The nation still sings of its hero to this very day.
See also: of, sing

sing of someone or something

to tell about or sing a song about someone or something. The folksinger sang of Paul Bunyan. They all sang of happier times in the past.
See also: of, sing
References in classic literature ?
When Harris is at a party, and is asked to sing, he replies: "Well, I can only sing a COMIC song, you know;" and he says it in a tone that implies that his singing of THAT, however, is a thing that you ought to hear once, and then die.
In 1761 John Wesley wrote his "Rules for Hymn Singing," which still appear at the beginning of the Methodist Hymnal today: Wesley's Rules for the singing of hymns 1.
Last year, while visiting an African Methodist Episcopal Church in Cape Town, South Africa, I was moved to tears by a teenage boy who fervently joined in the singing of my favorite hymn, "Great Is Thy Faithfulness." I must admit that I was really surprised to see that a child of the 21st century was familiar with a traditional hymn at a time when a growing number of Christian congregations have traded in hymnbooks for overhead projection screens that beam the words to praise songs.
Since 1801, African American church folk have sought to assure that the transmission of our rich cultural heritage through the singing of hymns of all types has been codified through hymnals.
The first singing of the song was within God's self.
Sing them from your heart, and remember that in doing so we are joining in the singing of the angels and the saints before God's throne.
In one such instance, Paul D learns "the dollar value of his weight, his strength, his heart, his brain, his penis, and his future" but responds by singing of the "bosses and masters and misses; of mules and dogs and the shamelessness of life" in order to confirm his humanity in the face of Schoolteacher's dehumanizing "value" equations (226, 108).
Tuned to the reggae beat and intoned on the guitar, the repeater, and the bass, the singing of this psalm in the Rastafari Nyabinghi or ritual cultic celebration is one of the most authentic and passionate expressions of the Rastafarian spirit, a spirit of strong dissonance and rejection of t he Babylon culture.
Celebrating the life of Stephen and his powerful singing of God's song can set the tone for all on this Sunday after Christmas.
Another choice would be the singing of carefully chosen hymns that fill the requirement of the text of the Ordinary.