singe

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sing off the same songsheet

To have the same understanding of something as someone else; to say the same things about something as other people, especially in public. Primarily heard in UK. I think we should have a meeting with everyone who's involved in the project. That way, we'll all be singing off the same songsheet before we begin. Make sure everyone on the campaign is singing off the same songsheet before we release any kind of statement to the press.
See also: off, same, sing, songsheet

sing off the same songbook

To have the same understanding of something as someone else; to say the same things about something as other people, especially in public. Primarily heard in UK. I think we should have a meeting with everyone who's involved in the project. That way, we'll all be singing off the same songbook before we begin. Make sure everyone on the campaign is singing off the same songbook before we release any kind of statement to the press.
See also: off, same, sing, songbook

sing off the same hymn sheet

To have the same understanding of something as someone else; to say the same things about something as other people, especially in public. Primarily heard in UK. I think we should have a meeting with everyone who's involved in the project. That way, we'll all be singing off the same hymn sheet before we begin. Make sure everyone on the campaign is singing off the same hymn sheet before we release any kind of statement to the press.
See also: hymn, off, same, sheet, sing

sing off the same hymnbook

To have the same understanding of something as someone else; to say the same things about something as other people, especially in public. Primarily heard in UK. I think we should have a meeting with everyone who's involved in the project. That way, we'll all be singing off the same hymnbook before we begin. Make sure everyone on the campaign is singing off the same hymnbook before we release any kind of statement to the press.
See also: hymnbook, off, same, sing

sing from the same songsheet

To have the same understanding of something as someone else; to say the same things about something as other people, especially in public. Primarily heard in UK. I think we should have a meeting with everyone who's involved in the project. That way, we'll all be singing from the same songsheet before we begin. Make sure everyone from the campaign is singing from the same songsheet before we release any kind of statement to the press.
See also: same, sing, songsheet

sing from the same songbook

To have the same understanding of something as someone else; to say the same things about something as other people, especially in public. Primarily heard in UK. I think we should have a meeting with everyone who's involved in the project. That way, we'll all be singing from the same songbook before we begin. Make sure everyone from the campaign is singing from the same songbook before we release any kind of statement to the press.
See also: same, sing, songbook

sing from the same hymn sheet

To have the same understanding of something as someone else; to say the same things about something as other people, especially in public. Primarily heard in UK. I think we should have a meeting with everyone who's involved in the project. That way, we'll all be singing from the same hymn sheet before we begin. Make sure everyone from the campaign is singing from the same hymn sheet before we release any kind of statement to the press.
See also: hymn, same, sheet, sing

sing from the same hymnbook

To have the same understanding of something as someone else; to say the same things about something as other people, especially in public. Primarily heard in UK. I think we should have a meeting with everyone who's involved in the project. That way, we'll all be singing from the same hymnbook before we begin. Make sure everyone from the campaign is singing from the same hymnbook before we release any kind of statement to the press.
See also: hymnbook, same, sing

sing like a canary

To inform against someone to the police or other authority about their criminal or illicit behavior. I heard Joey Malone has been singing like a canary in the hopes of getting his sentence reduced. Let's make sure he's sleeping with the fishes before he gets the chance!
See also: canary, like, sing

sing in tribulation

To succumb to torture and confess one's misdeeds. I know he stole chickens from my farm, and he'll tell you all about it, once he's singing in tribulation!
See also: sing, tribulation

sing soprano

To be able to sing in the soprano vocal range, which is the highest singing voice for women and boys. The soprano range starts at middle C and goes two octaves higher. Who here can sing soprano? I can't believe they picked me to sing soprano on the harmony for that song—I'm so excited!
See also: sing

all-singing, all-dancing

Very technologically advanced. Have you seen the latest all-singing, all-dancing cell phone model?

church ain't out till they quit singing

Something is not over yet. Yes, we've had some setbacks this season, but that's no excuse to give up. Church ain't out till they quit singing!
See also: church, out, quit, singe, till

sing (someone's or something's) praises

To speak very highly of something or someone; to enthusiastically endorse someone or something; to extol the virtues, benefits, or good qualities of someone or something. Our manager has been singing the new developers' praises. I hope they're up to the job! Jeff sang his phone's praises right up until it froze on him all of a sudden last night.
See also: praise, sing

sing the same tune

To have the same understanding of something as someone else; to say the same things about something as other people, especially in public. I think we should have a meeting with everyone who's involved in the project. That way we can all be singing the same tune before we begin. Make sure everyone the campaign is singing the same tune before we release any kind of statement to the press.
See also: same, sing, tune

sing the blues

1. Literally, to sing blues music or in that style. There was this old man singing the blues at the bar last night; it was a really moving bit of music.
2. By extension, to complain, whine, or express grief, especially as a means of gaining sympathy from others. Primarily heard in US. Many people will sing the blues over trivial inconveniences, while millions of others silently suffer real hardships every day.
See also: blues, sing

sing up a storm

To sing enthusiastically. Even since Jill found out that she'll be the lead in the musical, she's been singing up a storm around the house.
See also: sing, storm, up

Church ain't out till they quit singing.

Rur. things have not yet reached the end. Charlie: No way our team can win now. Mary: Church ain't out till they quit singing. There's another inning to go.
See also: church, out, quit, singe, till

burst into

1. Also, burst out in or into . Break out into sudden activity. For example, burst into flames means "break out in a fire," as in This dry woodpile may well burst into flames. A version of this term, which dates from the 16th century, was used figuratively by John Milton: "Fame is the spur ... But the fair guerdon [reward] when we hope to find, and think to burst out into sudden blaze" ( Lycidas, 1637).
2. Also, burst out. Give sudden utterance to. For example, burst into tears or laughter or song or speech or burst out crying or laughing or singing , etc. mean "begin suddenly to weep, laugh, sing," and so on, as in When she saw him, she burst into tears, or I burst out laughing when I saw their outfits, or When they brought in the cake, we all burst into song. These terms have been so used since the late 1300s.
See also: burst

all-singing, all-dancing

mainly BRITISH
If you describe something as all-singing, all-dancing, you mean that it is very modern and advanced, with a lot of additional features. He showed us their new all-singing, all-dancing website. The previous venue has now been replaced by a lavish all-singing, all-dancing stadium, due to open in April. Note: This expression is often used humorously to show that you think the features are not necessary. Note: The phrase originally appeared on a poster advertising the first ever Hollywood musical film Broadway Melody (1929), described as `all talking, all singing, all dancing'.

sing from the same hymn sheet

or

sing from the same song sheet

BRITISH
If two or more people sing from the same hymn sheet or sing from the same song sheet, they express the same opinions about a subject in public. The important thing is to bring together the departments so that we're all singing from the same hymn sheet. As she and her husband deal with the latest scandal, they can at least be relied on to sing from the same song sheet.
See also: hymn, same, sheet, sing

burst into

v.
1. To enter some place suddenly and forcefully: The police burst into the room and conducted a raid.
2. To start doing something suddenly: Sometimes we burst into song while we're hiking in the mountains.
See also: burst

scorched

1. mod. alcohol or drug intoxicated. Who wants to go out and get scorched?
2. and singed (sɪndʒd) mod. having to do with hair burned while smoking marijuana. (Collegiate.) If you go to sleep, you’ll be singed for sure.
See also: scorch

singed

verb
See also: singe
References in periodicals archive ?
Au terme de la conference de presse, les deux singes ont avoue la verite en disant: "Nous mettions beaucoup en colere notre mere par notre turbulence.
Un singe a dit: Nous nous sommes enfuis quand nous avons su que nous etions dans le village des marchandises et nous avons senti que nous n'en sortirons pas vivants a cause de la bureaucratie humaine.