silly season


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silly season

A period during which news outlets cover frivolous or less serious news stories, typically during the summer when fewer topics are generated. Primarily heard in UK. I don't even buy the paper during the silly season because there's nothing worth reading about. You know it's the silly season when your assignment is to cover the circus.
See also: season, silly

the silly season

the months of August and September regarded as the time when newspapers often publish trivia because of a lack of important news. chiefly British
This concept and phrase date back to the mid 19th century. In high summer Victorian London was deserted by the wealthy and important during the period in which Parliament and the law courts were in recess.
See also: season, silly

the ˈsilly season

(British English) the time, usually in the summer, when newspapers are full of unimportant stories because there is little serious news
See also: season, silly
References in periodicals archive ?
Markets, incentives, and social norms are the standard meat and drink of this column - and normal service on them will be resumed next week, when silly season is at last drawing to an end.
Well to get into this Silly Season mood Uncle Norbert and I have just changed into our Colonel Bogey shorts, string vests and knotted hankerchiefs ready for a game of Nick Kyrgios tennis on a court close to a main road to drown out the swearing.
But is this just a result of the world waking up after the recession and things getting back to "normal" or is there actual evidence to suggest a trend in increased activity during the silly season? Looking back at enquiry levels during 2013 and 2014 the evidence would certainly appear to confirm that activity was higher during the three months of summer than at any other time of the year.
Episode 2 of silly season came last week when Willie Price, an African American candidate for city Council running with the backing of the Republican Party, had that backing taken away because of a couple of posts he made on his Facebook Page.
But now that the silly season has transformed horribly into the serious season, with the murder of US hostage James Foley by a British Jihadist fighting with Islamic State, pictures of Cameron lazing in Cornwall after just 19 hours in London are infuriating.
At least it's not long now until the silly season is replaced by the actual season and the serious business of biting fellow professionals, kicking 17-year-old ballboys and booing your own club's manager.
We need serious policies to drag us out of this double-dip recession, and far fewer "silly season" stunts.
They obviously don't make Silly Seasons like they used to: those months from June to September when an MP parked his mistress in a Mayfair flat and went home to the family, when school holidays were timed to coincide with airport baggage handlers' strikes and at least a brace of budget airlines went bust turning Heathrow into the Dossers' Hilton.
Its extraordinary and questionable age of 254 was old enough to maKe a silly season story.
So whether you're a fan of Blues, Villa, Wolves or Albion, be sure to not take everything as gospel when the silly season really kicks into gear after the World Cup.
"This is silly season. Results are strange at this time of year and I don't want any results that might upset us."
Ferguson also said that he has not spent the amount till now, as he believes the squad he has assembled is strong enough to cope with the demands of the championships, and due to the "silly season" values in the transfer market.
Especially now that the silly season is over and the conjurors are back in town.
Media stories reached into minutiae, and Barack Obama bemoaned what he called "silly season." Stories focused on who was seated where on a campaign plane, or who wore what to an event.
They don't call this time of year the "Silly Season" at Worcester City Hall for nothing.