signed


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Related to signed: signed integer

sign (one's) life away

To forfeit one's rights or control over some integral aspect of one's life, typically one's financial interests, as through some signed deal or agreement. Because our financial portfolio was so bad, we basically had to sign our lives away to get approved for a mortgage with the bank. If you agree to this plea bargain, the government will have total control over your property, accounts, and future revenue—so think very carefully before you sign your life away.
See also: away, life, sign

signed and sealed

Officially approved or verified; successfully executed or completed. Once the contract is signed and sealed, we'll send an engineer to the house to set up the new satellite dish. The deal between the two companies has been signed and sealed.
See also: and, seal, signed

sign away

To sign an agreement giving away or relinquishing something. A noun or pronoun can be used betwee "sign" and "away." Many people unwittingly sign away their right to privacy when they use these high-tech devices. He signed the deed to the house away in a drunken game of high-stakes poker.
See also: away, sign

sign off

1. To end or announce the end of a program, transmission, broadcast, or other mass communication. And that brings us to the end of today's show. Until next time, this is your host, John Bicksby, signing off.
2. To end one's session in a digital account or network (typically one accessed by having entered personal credentials); to log off. If you're using a public computer, always make sure you sign off at the end of your session.
3. To cause someone's session in a digital account or network to be ended; to log someone off. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is usually used between "sign" and "off." Just when I was about to finalize the purchase, the site signed me off.
See also: off, sign

sign off on (something)

To give express, formal approval of something, often by literally signing a document. We're just waiting for the boss to sign off on the project before we start working. My thesis supervisor has to sign off on each chapter I write to make sure I'm staying focused on the topic.
See also: off, on, sign

sign on the dotted line

To give one's formal agreement or assent by signing a legally binding contract document. We've approved you for a $10,000 loan. You just need to sign on the dotted line, and we'll transfer the funds to your account. Be sure to read all the fine print before you sign on the dotted line.
See also: dot, line, on, sign

sign out

1. To record one's departure in a list, log book, or register. All visitors must sign out when they are leaving the premises. Please remember to sign out when you are finished your shift, or else your pay for that period may not be calculated correctly.
2. To end or announce the end of a program, transmission, broadcast, or other mass communication. And that brings us to the end of today's show. Until next time, this is your host, John Bicksby, signing out.
3. To end one's session in a digital account or network (typically one accessed by having entered personal credentials); to log out. If you're using a public computer, always make sure you sign out at the end of your session. You should always sign out of these websites after you're finished shopping.
4. To cause someone's session in a digital account or network to be ended; to log someone out. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is usually used between "sign" and "out." Just when I was about to finalize the purchase, the site signed me out.
5. To record the temporary removal of something that one or someone else is borrowing. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "sign" and "out." You'll have to sign the equipment out if you want to take it from the lab. You can sign out three books at a time. You'll have to return them first if you want to borrow more.
See also: out, sign

sign over

To transfer the rights of ownership or possession to someone else. A noun or pronoun can be used between "sign" and "over." The wealthy widow signed over her entire estate to her only granddaughter. You should never borrow money from loan sharks like these—you may end up signing over everything you own to them.
See also: over, sign

sign up

1. To enlist or enroll oneself or someone in something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "sign" and "up." My mother signed me up for piano lessons on the weekend. She signed up with a talent agency to try to land some gigs.
2. To subscribe oneself or someone to something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "sign" and "up." If you sign up a friend for the service, you'll get $20 credit to your account. You should sign yourself up to our monthly newsletter if you want to know our latest products and promotional offers.
See also: sign, up

sign for

1. To provide one's signature in order to receive or approve of something. Your package is scheduled to arrive tomorrow. Please be sure someone will be present to sign for it. A: "I need a signature saying this project was approved." B: "I can sign for it."
2. To provide one's signature (on or for something) in lieu of someone else. A noun or pronoun can be used between "sign" and "for." The boss isn't here right now, but I can for her. Sarah will be signing all time slips for me while I'm away.
See also: sign

sign into

1. To enter one's or someone else's name or signature onto a ledger in order to be admitted into some place or event. A noun or pronoun can be used between "sign" and "into." Everyone has to sign into the event so no one can slip through without paying. Please sign your child into playgroup at the start of each session. You should sign yourself into a hospital if that pain doesn't ease up.
2. To enter into a computer, website, or computer program by entering in the required personal information, such as a password and username. I can sign into the computer at the library and email you the files from there. You will have to sign into the website before you can complete your purchase.
3. To ratify a piece of legislation by putting one's signature onto it. A noun or pronoun can be used between "sign" and "into"; almost always followed by the word "law." The president has refused to sign into law and bill that does not include funding for her controversial infrastructure plan. The governor has already indicated that he will sign the bill into law if it passes through the state senate.
See also: sign

sign on

1. To become enlisted or recruited as an employee. Starting next fall, I'll be signing on as their new head of marketing. The labor pool continues to grow, with more people signing on every month.
2. To employee, enlist, or recruit someone to begin working for someone or something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "sign" and "on." We'll be hosting a huge campaign to sign on new talent for our up-and-coming design company. The local coal company has been trying to sign high school graduates on as an alternative to the traditional college route.
3. To announce or introduce a program, broadcast, or transmission, as on radio, television, or the internet. You need to remember to sign on before you begin your segment each morning. Part of the popular YouTuber's success is his very recognizable way of signing on at the beginning of each of his videos.
See also: on, sign

sign with (someone or something)

To sign a contract of employment with a particular group or organization. Used especially in reference to professional athletes. The star quarterback has signed with the Miami Dolphins for the next season. I'm planning on signing with the law firm in California, unless the firm in New York offers me a better deal.
See also: sign

signed, sealed, and delivered

Officially approved or verified; successfully executed or completed. Once the contract is signed, sealed, and delivered, we'll send an engineer to the house to set up the new satellite dish. The deal between the two companies has been signed, sealed, and delivered.
See also: and, deliver

sign for someone

to sign something, using one's own signature in place of someone else's signature; to sign something, using another person's name, adding the phrase "by [one's own name]." He's not here. I will sign for him. Where do I sign? Who will sign for Mr. Wilson?
See also: sign

sign for something

to sign a piece of paper indicating that one has received something. Would you sign for this, please? Ted signed for the package and opened it up.
See also: sign

sign off

 
1. Lit. [for a broadcaster] to announce the end of programming for the day; [for an amateur radio operator] to announce the end of a transmission. Wally signed off and turned the transmitter off. Channel 43 failed to sign off at the scheduled time last night.
2. Fig. to quit doing what one has been doing and leave, go to bed, quit trying to do something, etc. I have to sign off and get to bed. See you all. When you finally sign off tonight, please turn out all the lights.
See also: off, sign

sign on

to announce the beginning of a broadcast transmission. The announcer signed on and then played "The Star-Spangled Banner." We usually sign on at six in the morning.
See also: on, sign

sign on the dotted line

 
1. Lit. to indicate one's agreement or assent by placing one's signature on a special line provided for that purpose. (The line may be solid or dotted.) I agreed to the contract, but I haven't signed on the dotted line yet. When you have signed on the dotted line, please give me a call.
2. Fig. to indicate one's agreement to something. Okay. I agree to your terms. I'll sign on the dotted line. He is thinking favorably about going with us to Canada, but he hasn't signed on the bottom line.
See also: dot, line, on, sign

sign on (with someone or something) (as something)

to join up with someone or something in a particular capacity by signing a contract or agreement. I signed on with the captain of the Felicity Anne as first mate. Roger signed on as manager for the new store.
See also: on, sign

sign out

to indicate that one is leaving a place or going out temporarily by signing a piece of paper or a list. I forgot to sign out when I left. Please sign out every time you leave.
See also: out, sign

sign someone on

to employ someone; to recruit someone as an employee. How many workers did the manager sign on? The construction company signed on ten new workers.
See also: on, sign

sign someone up (for something)

to record the agreement of someone, including oneself, to participate in something. Has anyone signed you up for the office picnic? Can you sign up Liz for the party?
See also: sign, up

sign someone up (with someone or something)

to record the agreement of someone to join someone, a group of people, or an organization. I want to sign George up with our softball team. Tom signed up his friends with the agency.
See also: sign, up

sign something away

to sign a paper in which one gives away one's rights to something. Valerie signed her rights away. she signed away her claim to the money.
See also: away, sign

sign something for someone

 
1. to sign one's signature on a paper in place of someone else's signature. Would you please sign this for me? I can't sign it right now. Would you sign it for me?
2. to sign a paper for another person, using that person's name, adding the phrase "by [one's own name]." When the delivery comes, will you please sign my name for me? I signed Ted's name for him.
See also: sign

sign something over (to someone)

to sign a paper granting the rights to or ownership of something to a specific person. Larry signed all the rights to his book over to the publisher. He signed over all the rights to the publisher.
See also: over, sign

sign up (for something)

to record one's agreement to participate in something. I want to sign up for guitar lessons. We will sign up as soon as possible.
See also: sign, up

signed, sealed, and delivered

Fig. formally and officially signed; [for a formal document to be] executed. Here is the deed to the propertysigned, sealed, and delivered. I can't begin work on this project until I have the contract signed, sealed, and delivered.
See also: and, deliver

signed, sealed, and delivered

Completed satisfactorily, as in The house is sold-signed, sealed, and delivered. This idiom refers to a legal deed, which to be valid had to be signed by the seller, sealed with a wax seal, and delivered to the new owner. It began to be used more loosely in the first half of the 1900s.
See also: and, deliver

sign off

1. Announce the end of a communication, especially a broadcast. For example, There's no one there now; the station has signed off for the night. [c. 1920]
2. Stop talking, become silent, as in Every time the subject of marriage came up, Harold signed off. [Colloquial; mid-1900s]
3. Express approval formally or conclusively, as in The President got the majority leader to sign off on the tax proposal. This usage is colloquial.
See also: off, sign

sign on

1. Enlist oneself as an employee, as in Arthur decided to sign on with the new software company. [Late 1800s]
2. Begin radio or television broadcasting, especially at the beginning of the day, as in What time does the station sign on? [c. 1920]
See also: on, sign

sign on the dotted line

Agree formally or fully, as in The deal is just about fixed; all they have to do is sign on the dotted line. This idiom refers to the broken line traditionally appearing at the bottom of a legal document, indicating the place for one's signature. [Early 1900s]
See also: dot, line, on, sign

sign out

Record the departure of a person or the removal of an object, as in He turned in his room key and signed out about an hour ago, or I asked the librarian how many books I could sign out. [c. 1930]
See also: out, sign

sign over

Legally dispose of or make over to a different owner, as in She signed over nearly all of her property to the church. [Early 1700s]
See also: over, sign

sign up

Enlist in an organization; also, register or subscribe to something. For example, He signed up for four years in the navy, or Are you planning to sign up for that pottery class? [Early 1900s]
See also: sign, up

sign on the dotted line

COMMON If you sign on the dotted line, you formally agree to something by signing an official document. Once you sign on the dotted line you are committed to that property. Note: You can also say that someone signs on the line. He signed on the line and can only blame himself. Note: You can also talk about someone's name on the dotted line or signature on the dotted line. He went to see Malcolm's widow, Betty, too; he needed her name on the dotted line.
See also: dot, line, on, sign

signed and sealed

or

signed, sealed, and delivered

COMMON If an agreement is signed and sealed or signed, sealed, and delivered, it is official and cannot be changed. Although a peace agreement has been signed and sealed, many villagers say they're afraid to return to their homes. A government spokesman said the bill must be signed, sealed and delivered by tomorrow. Note: In the past, documents were `sealed' with wax into which a special mark or design was pressed using a device called a seal. The mark or design in the wax proved that the document was authentic and had not been opened.
See also: and, seal, signed

sign on the dotted line

agree formally.
1921 P. G. Wodehouse Indiscretions of Archie I spoke to him as one old friend to another…and he sang a few bars from ‘Rigoletto’, and signed on the dotted line.
See also: dot, line, on, sign

signed, sealed, and delivered (or signed and sealed)

formally and officially agreed and in effect.
See also: and, deliver

sign on the dotted ˈline

(informal) sign your name at the bottom of a contract and so agree to a deal, etc: The job isn’t mine until I’ve signed on the dotted line.
See also: dot, line, on, sign

ˌsigned, ˌsealed and deˈlivered

,

ˌsigned and ˈsealed

definite, because all the legal documents have been signed: At the conference they hope to have a treaty signed, sealed and delivered by Tuesday.
See also: and, deliver, seal

sign away

v.
To give something up by signing one's name; relinquish something by signature: When they agreed to settle the lawsuit, they signed away their claim to the estate. If you wanted the right to sell your work independently, you shouldn't have signed it away by joining the organization.
See also: away, sign

sign for

v.
To accept some delivery by signing a document: I went to the door to sign for the package.
See also: sign

sign into

v.
1. To ratify some legislation by affixing a signature, seal, or other mark, so as to bring it into some state of existence: The president signed the bill into law.
2. To provide the necessary information to a computer for someone to be allowed access to some set of computer resources: I'll sign you into the website so you can read the whole article. I signed into my account on the website and checked my order status.
See also: sign

sign off

v.
1. To announce the end of a communication; conclude: I've come to the end of my message, so now I'm signing off.
2. To stop transmission after identifying the broadcasting station: This is your morning radio host, signing off.
3. sign off on To express approval formally or conclusively: The president got Congress to sign off on the new tax proposal.
See also: off, sign

sign on

v.
1. To enlist oneself, especially as an employee: He signed on for two years with the Peace Corps. She signed on as a sales representative and was soon promoted to district manager.
2. To start transmission with an identification of the broadcasting station: Our local public television station signs on every morning at 6:00.
See also: on, sign

sign out

v.
1. To record the departure of another or oneself by signing a register: Go to the front desk and sign out while I take the bags to the car. Don't forget to sign out your guest when you leave the club. I signed myself out as I was leaving.
2. To borrow some item and register the borrowing by signing one's name: They signed out all the canoes at the club. If you would like to examine the file more closely, you can sign it out and take it home.
3. To disconnect someone from some computer resource to which one has been connected or logged on: Remember to sign out of your account before you leave the computer. The website automatically signs you out after 15 minutes.
4. To end communication and disconnect officially. Used to notify others: The trucker radioed the dispatcher and signed out. Now that I've finished my story, I'm signing out!
See also: out, sign

sign over

v.
To transfer ownership or possession of something by signing one's name: He'll have to sign his next two paychecks over to his creditors. She signed over her fortune to charity.
See also: over, sign

sign up

v.
1. To register by or as if by signing one's name; enlist: The army recruiter persuaded me to sign up. I signed up to volunteer at the hospital. Would you like to sign up for our free newsletter?
2. To register someone or something by or as if by signing one's name; enlist someone or something: I signed my daughter up for swimming lessons. The telemarketer signed up another four customers.
3. To hire or engage someone by obtaining a signature on a contract: The producer is signing up actors for a touring play. The team signed a rookie pitcher up for next season.
See also: sign, up
References in periodicals archive ?
8 million, one-year contract; re-signed Luke Hochevar, rhp, to a $10 million, two-year contract; signed Kendrys Morales, dh, Seattle, to a $17 million, two-year contract; signed Alex Rios, of, Toronto, to an $11 million, one-year contract; signed Edinson Volquez, rhp, Pittsburgh, to a $20 million, two-year contract.
Luxury Nails and Spa signed a lease at Point View Shopping Center on Berdan Avenue in Wayne.
Mogilny returns to Devils: Alexander Mogilny, the right wing who earned a Stanley Cup ring with New Jersey, signed a two-year contract to return to the Devils
KANSAS CITY (3) _ Signed Jason Vargas, lhp, Los Angeles Angels, to a $32 million, four-year contract; signed Omar Infante, 2b, Detroit, to a $30.
announced that Subway has signed a 4,500 SF lease at 422 Madison Ave.
The Kushner Companies announced that New York University has signed a 15-year, 75,000 SF lease at its 295 Lafayette St.
announced that Gold Coast Vendors has signed a 30,000 SF sub-lease in Island Park, N.
SAY HELLO: Traded for G Eddie Jones, F Anthony Mason, G Ricky Davis, F Dale Ellis (Charlotte), F Brian Grant (Portland); signed free agents G Rick Brunson, F Todd Fuller, F Don MacLean; drafted G Eddie House (37th overall).
Futterman & Associates, LLC announced that Modell's Sporting Goods has signed a 20,000 SF lease at 2101 Church Ave.
Symbian Signed is the industry-endorsed application signing program that promotes best practices in Symbian OS(TM) content and application development.
Kids U has signed a 5,400 SF lease at 507 Wesport Ave.
The Staubach Company announced that Whole Foods Market has signed a 36,000 SF lease at the Source at White Plains in White Plains, N.
Beltre told MLB he signed the contract April 27, 1994, but the document was post-dated July 7, Boras said.
Cushman & Wakefield announced that Broadview International has signed a 33,726 SF sublease at 1345 Ave.