sight

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But when you landed, we were driven to crawl like sarpents, beneath the leaves; and then we lost sight of you entirely, until we placed eyes on you again trussed to the trees, and ready bound for an Indian massacre.
He looked at them sitting silent and self-absorbed, and the sight annoyed him.
Again adjusting his sights he took a long-range shot at a distant machine-gun crew to his right.
Always just far enough behind to be out of sight, he kept pace with the little column as it marched through the torrid heat of the morning, until a little after noon he was startled by the sudden cry of a woman in distress, and the answering shout of a man.
The little patches of snow which yet lingered on the northern sides of the mountains, the lakes, and the dashing of the rocky streams were all familiar and dear sights to me.
A child, playing in some weeds, caught sight of her as she neared the quarters.
We had hardly turned on the common, when we caught sight again of the green habit flying on before us.
I was so overcome with joy at this sight that I forgot all the old man had told me, and cried out, "Allah be praised
Says the old ballad--it was a seemly sight to see how Robin Hood himself had dressed, and all his yeomanry.
Yet for the sake of the young and inexperienced, who may perchance infer -- from the two simple instances I have given above, of the manner in which I should recognize my Father and my Sons -- that Recognition by sight is an easy affair, it may be needful to point out that in actual life most of the problems of Sight Recognition are far more subtle and complex.
The sight was awe-inspiring in the extreme as one contemplated this mighty floating funeral pyre, drifting unguided and unmanned through the lonely wastes of the Martian heavens; a derelict of death and destruction, typifying the life story of these strange and ferocious creatures into whose unfriendly hands fate had carried it.
He had gone but a short distance in return when he was brought to a sudden and startled halt by sight of a strange figure moving through the trees toward him.
And I recall now with a sort of wonder that, in spite of the infinite danger in which we were between starvation and a still more terrible death, we could yet struggle bitterly for that horrible privilege of sight.
Thus, sight and blindness have reference to the eye.
A ship may have left her port some time before; she may have been at sea, in the fullest sense of the phrase, for days; but, for all that, as long as the coast she was about to leave remained in sight, a southern-going ship of yesterday had not in the sailor's sense begun the enterprise of a passage.