sigh

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Related to sigher: sighing, sire, SIER

heave a sigh of relief

To experience an intense feeling of happiness or relief because something particularly stressful, unpleasant, or undesirable has been avoided or completed. Everyone in class heaved a sigh of relief after that horrible midterm exam was over. Investors in Europe are heaving a big sigh of relief now that a Greek exit from the Euro has been avoided.
See also: heave, of, relief, sigh

sigh of relief

A feeling or display of relief that something particularly stressful, unpleasant, or undesirable has been avoided or completed. Everyone in class heaved a sigh of relief after that horrible midterm exam was over. Investors in Europe had a big sigh of relief now that a Greek exit from the Euro has been avoided.
See also: of, relief, sigh

breathe a sigh of relief

To experience an intense feeling of happiness or relief because something particularly stressful, unpleasant, or undesirable has been avoided or completed. Everyone in class breathed a sigh of relief after that horrible midterm exam was over. Investors are breathing a big sigh of relief now that the predicted downturn has seemingly been avoided.
See also: breathe, of, relief, sigh

sigh about (something)

To exhale a long, audible breath to indicate weariness, frustration, distress, etc., about some issue. He's been moping around the place ever since the breakup, sighing about his broken heart. I couldn't help sighing about my disappointment in not being chosen to be on the team.
See also: sigh

sigh for (someone or something)

To long, yearn, or grieve for someone or something. He's been moping around the place sighing for his girlfriend, who just moved to Canada last week. I am happy in my life, I truly am, but I can't help sighing for some of the opportunities I passed up or squandered over the years.
See also: sigh

breathe a sigh of relief

 
1. Lit. to sigh in a way that signals one's relief that something has come to an end. At the end of the contest, we all breathed a sigh of relief.
2. Fig. to express relief that something has ended. With the contract finally signed, we breathed a sigh of relief as we drank a toast in celebration.
See also: breathe, of, relief, sigh

sigh about something

to release a deep breath, indicating anxiety, distress, or relief about something. What are you sighing about? she sighed about her illness and then shifted her thoughts to something else.
See also: sigh

sigh for someone

to release a deep breath, indicating anxiety about one's emotional attachment for someone. Dave spent a lot of his time sighing for Laura, on whom he had a crush. Laura has been sighing for some as-yet-unnamed young man.
See also: sigh

sigh of relief, (heave) a

Whew; an expulsion of breath indicating that one is out of a tight spot. Sighing with longing, pain, grief, and numerous similar emotions is common in the English language—especially in poetry—from the earliest days. The word “sigh” comes from Middle English and Old English words meaning exactly the same thing (to expel breath). Heaving a sigh to express intense emotion, especially amatory longing or grief, was current from about 1700 on.
See also: of, sigh