sick and tired of (something)

sick and tired of (something)

Exceedingly wearied by, bored of, or exasperated with something. I'm sick and tired of doing my boss's errands. If something doesn't change soon, I'm going to quit! I was all gung-ho about this graduate program when I first began, but I must admit that I've grown sick and tired of these boring lectures.
See also: and, of, sick, tired
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

sick and tired

Also, sick or tired to death . Thoroughly weary or bored, as in I'm sick and tired of these begging phone calls, or She was sick to death of that endless recorded music. These hyperbolic expressions of exasperation imply one is weary to the point of illness or death. The first dates from the late 1700s, the first variant from the late 1800s, and the second variant from the first half of the 1700s.
See also: and, sick, tired
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

sick and tired

annoyed about or bored with something and unwilling to put up with it any longer. informal
See also: and, sick, tired
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

sick and tired

Thoroughly weary, discouraged, or bored.
See also: and, sick, tired
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

sick and tired

Disgusted, completely weary of. This expression, also put as sick or tired to death, suggests one is fed up to the point of illness or death. J. Hector St. John de Crevecoeur used it in Sketches of 18th-Century America (1783): “I am quite sick and tired of these pretended conscientious non-fighting mortals.”
See also: and, sick, tired
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
See also: