shuck off

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shuck off

1. To cast someone or something off from one's body. A noun or pronoun can be used between "shuck" and "off." The kids ran in and shucked their muddy boots and jackets off, leaving them strewn across my clean floors. I was glad to get inside and shuck off my dirty work clothes. The brute tried to grab me from behind, but I managed to shuck him off.
2. To discard, leave behind, or get rid of someone or something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "shuck" and "off." The country has long been trying to shuck off its reputation as a dangerous, crime-ridden place. I promised myself I would shuck smoking off for good this year. I could sense that someone was following me, so I tried darting down a series of alleys and side streets to shuck them off.
See also: off, shuck

shuck something off

 
1. to take something off. Tom shucked his jacket off and sat on the arm of the easy chair. He shucked off his jacket.
2. to get rid of someone or something. she shucked all her bad habits off. Tom shucked off one girlfriend after another.
See also: off, shuck
References in periodicals archive ?
Residual values for the XJ 5.0 were always so-so, the car retaining about 24 per cent of its new value after three years, which effectively meant an entry level car was shucking off almost PS20,000 per year in depreciation.
But I do believe that, in shucking off moderation and indeed most of its history, the GOP has damaged its long-term electability and effectiveness.
A good portion of his production came after shucking off would-be tacklers and then lowering the boom on whichever defenders stepped forward at the second level.
Since shucking off their very early abrasive punk sound in favour of something a bit more radio friendly, they've resolutely failed to hit the commercial heights of bands that are a lot less interesting yet still cite Les Savy Fav as big influences.
As you are winding your long way through that security-line conga dance, opening bags, taking off belts, shucking off shoes, removing computers from their cases, and generally mooing along with the rest of the herd, answer me this: Why are you doing all this?
who also admonished the industry against shucking off any of its own responsibilities for the "turbulent marketplace," said "I am sure that we do not want government in the insurance business any more than we want the banks in it." Yet, he said, the challenge is facing insurance carriers, agents, and brokers to unite in the common cause to aid the ailing industry, putting aside individual egos so that the desired results of a healthy industry may be Robert E.
You'll find them in the changing-rooms, shucking off familiar things, stepping out of marriages and motherhood and down to smalls, the known particulars of pleats and folds until the years have slipped away like underskirts and they are girls and girls not wanting to be thin, or young, or tall, or someone else, but just to have their due.
In shucking off such baggage, his pieces are, in a very real sense, radically heretical artefacts.
I went to work shucking off layers of clothes so I could at least get my Super Black Eagle in the general area of my shoulder when I mounted it.
In these Anglican contexts, Hempton says Methodists often acted like "clever parasites," taking from the tradition what they needed while shucking off other aspects of Anglicanism that were counterproductive.
We didn't believe in shucking off parental responsibilities.
The end of the Soviet Union left the United States at the pinnacle of power, tempting America to intervene when and where it likes while shucking off "institutional encumbrances" that the author views positively.
While I was attempting to infiltrate the literary coterie and thus reestablish my East Coast interests, Maia was shucking off the past, embracing L.A., and trying to grab all it had to offer.
Here's news we're supposed to be happy about: Now that the federal government has shucked off responsibility for th poor to the states, state governments3 are shucking off responsibility to counties and cities.