shrink

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pink it and shrink it

slang A strategy used in marketing and producing goods for women in which an existing product (especially one for men) is simply made smaller and pink. The variant "shrink it and pink it" is also used. What genius applied "pink it and shrink it" to sports jerseys? I don't want a jersey that's pink and sparkly, thank you very much!
See also: and, pink, shrink

shrink away (from someone or something)

1. To withdraw, recede, or recoil (from someone or something). The way the gums are shrinking away from your teeth is a clear sign of gingivitis. The child shrank away as the strange man approached him.
2. To avoid or neglect some action, duty, or responsibility. You wanted to lead this branch, which means you can't shrink away from the thornier aspects of the job. We need someone who won't shrink away when it comes to making tough decisions.
See also: away, shrink, someone

shrink back

To recede or recoil. The way the gums are shrinking back from your teeth is a clear sign of gingivitis. The child shrank back when we approached the house.
See also: back, shrink

shrink from (someone or something)

1. To recede or recoil from someone or something. The way the gums are shrinking from your teeth is a clear sign of gingivitis. The child shrank from the men as they approached the house.
2. To avoid or neglect some action, duty, or responsibility. You wanted to lead this branch, which means you can't shrink from the thornier aspects of the job. We need someone who won't shrink from making tough decisions.
See also: shrink

shrink it and pink it

slang A strategy used in marketing and producing goods for women in which an existing product (especially one for men) is simply made smaller and pink. The variant "pink it and shrink it" is also used. What genius applied "shrink it and pink it" to sports jerseys? I don't want a jersey that's pink and sparkly, thank you very much!
See also: and, pink, shrink

shrink up

1. To become shrunken or shriveled. These pants will shrink up if you wash them in hot water.
2. To cause something to become shrunken or shriveled. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "shrink" and "up." The plastic wrap fits loosely around the boxes, then the heat from the machine shrinks it up to create a snug fit.
3. To recoil and contract one's body into a smaller posture. The children shrank up as their parents began shouting at each other at the dinner table. I shrank up in the shadows of the alley to avoid being seen by the patrolling guards.
4. To become withdrawn socially. I've noticed Tom shrinking up more and more in the classroom. I'd better check to see that everything is all right. After the divorce, I just sort of shrank up and kept myself to myself.
See also: shrink, up

shrinking violet

A negative term for a very shy person. After years of being seen as nothing more than a shrinking violet, Christine decided to overcome her fears and start talking to strangers.
See also: shrink, violet
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

shrinking violet

Fig. someone who is very shy and not assertive. I am not exactly a shrinking violet, but I don't have the guts to say what you said to her.
See also: shrink, violet
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

shrinking violet, a

An extremely shy person, as in She was a shrinking violet until she went away to college. This metaphoric idiom refers to the flower, but the precise allusion is unclear, since violets thrive under a variety of conditions and often are considered a garden weed. [Early 1900s]
See also: shrink
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

a shrinking violet

If you describe someone as a shrinking violet, you mean that they are very shy. Give him a tough assignment and he turns into a shrinking violet. None of the women he paints could be described as shrinking violets. Note: You can say that someone is no shrinking violet to mean that they are very self-confident. Amber is no shrinking violet. She is a brash colourful character. Note: In the past, violets were considered to be a symbol of modesty, because of their small size and the fact that the flowers remain hidden among the leaves until they open.
See also: shrink, violet
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

shrinking violet

an exaggeratedly shy person. informal
2004 Sunday Times Clough was no shrinking violet. He had absolute belief in himself and his methods, and wasn't afraid to say so to anybody.
See also: shrink, violet
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

a ˌshrinking ˈviolet

(humorous) a very shy person who is easily frightened: I can’t imagine why a dynamic young woman like her is marrying a shrinking violet like him.
See also: shrink, violet
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

shrink back

v.
To draw back instinctively, as in alarm; recoil: The dog shrank back in fear when I raised my hand.
See also: back, shrink

shrink from

v.
1. To draw back instinctively from someone or something; recoil from someone or something: The cat shrank from my touch.
2. To show reluctance to engage in or do something; hesitate to perform something, especially out of fear: I will not shrink from my duty as captain to defend the ship. They will not shrink from prosecuting each of us if they catch us stealing.
See also: shrink
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

shrink

n. a psychoanalyst or psychotherapist. I dropped a bundle on a shrink, but it didn’t help me.
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

shrinking violet, a

A very shy individual. Why the violet, a small but common shade-loving perennial, should be chosen to designate shyness is unclear. On the contrary, violets can boldly take over patches of ground, and gardeners may even find them difficult to eradicate from unwanted spaces. Nevertheless, the phrase has been used since the early 1900s. The Listener stated (July 22, 1976), “Frayn has not forgotten the underdog. . . . The shrinking violet . . . is the most dangerous plant in the glades of privilege.”
See also: shrink
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer

shrinking violet

A shy person. The violet flower gives the impression of shyness, growing as it does close to the protective ground and often beneath other plants, shrubs and trees. Compared to other larger foliage, violets do seem to look as though they are shrinking, growing smaller. As applied to shy people, the phrase first appeared in both America and Great Britain in the 1820s.
See also: shrink, violet
Endangered Phrases by Steven D. Price Copyright © 2011 by Steven D. Price
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References in periodicals archive ?
The patent-pending device, used with the Shrinker system, provides a practical method of accurately presetting shrink fit tooling within 0.0005", four times more accurately than previous methods.
The system combines Briney's Shrinker Thermo-Contraction Toolholding System with a Speroni tool presetter and software for use with shrink fit automotive industry tooling.
I doubt Mrs May and Mr Davis will encounter any head shrinkers either, however much they reckon the European Commission is full of tiny brains.
Those genes would be the most important wing shrinkers, Burga and colleagues reasoned.
The main proportional reasoning problem types include rate problems (involving both commonly used rates, such as speed, and rate situations in which the relationship between quantities is defined within the question, such as birthday cake slices per child); part-part-whole (e.g., ratio problems in which two complementary parts are compared with each other or the whole, such as comparing numbers of boys to girls in a class or boys to total students); and stretchers and shrinkers (growth or scale problems; see Lamon, 2005).
"Documentary Journey to the Land of the Head Shrinkers." Trans.
His discharge equipment included residual-limb shrinkers, two triangular bed wedges, a left wrist and finger dorsal resting hand splint, a hemisling, a power tilt/recline/elevate wheelchair, a skin inspection mirror, and a Bioness (Valencia, California) hand functional electrical stimulation unit.
As Jean-Louis Comolli writes in "Documentary Journey to the Land of the Head Shrinkers": [T]he work of the cinematic scene is actually a prefiguration of the moment of absence, intensifying through it this moment of presence, so as to intensify, finally, the presence of bodies through the promise of their coming absence.
John Holt and Son, Ltd, London Shrinkers and Waterproofers, was formed in Huddersfield in the mid 1800s by Oxfordshire John's great-great grandfather.
A few are labeled "Shrinkers" women who want a companion but refuse to actively search for one; "Swingles" women who never find it difficult to find a man to date; and "Tickers" women who are desperate to find a man because they believe they are running out of time.
The other nine top shrinkers are in Eastern Germany (six), Spain (two) and Italy (one).
Yet as a good citizen of the applied behavioral community, I also used to join in deriding them as "nerds" and "techies" - while they simultaneously derided us behavioral types as "head shrinkers" and "witch doctors." I don't deride them any more.
The Jivaro of southern Ecuador had been the infamous headhunters and head shrinkers of the Amazon basin.
And just like other businesses, the group, which also owns Liverpool's John Lennon and Doncaster Sheffield airports, is looking at footprint shrinkers from biomass to electric vehicles.