shotgun shack


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shotgun shack

(chiefly Southern United States slang) A one-story house in which each room is in a straight alignment with the others, connected by a continuous hallway running from the front to the back of the residence. When our whole family goes to stay in my grandmother's shotgun shack in New Orleans, it always feels like we're all right on top of one another.
See also: shack, shotgun
References in periodicals archive ?
It fell on the row of shotgun shacks, on the burned-out grocery, on the street in front of the shuttered tavern.
Confidently standing onstage (the specific venue is never identified) dressed in black turtleneck and pants, Sample shocks the listener with descriptions of his upbringing in a shotgun shack in Longview, Texas, under the alternately loving and brutalizing, care of his black prostitute mother he calls only by her nickname, Big Emma.
Tracing the steps of Elvis from the shotgun shack in Tupelo - so called because you could shoot a shotgun through it and not hit any furniture, to Gracelands, the luxury mansion the singer brought with his new riches - his rapid rise to fame and fortune is glaringly apparent.
They also decorated the interior and exterior of her Everlasting Gospel Mission, a shotgun shack in the bohemian Lower Ninth Ward, her headquarters from the late '50s on.
Elvis was raised in poverty in a shotgun shack, so named because you could shoot right the way through it.
Believability, in fact, is stretched from the start, when 45-year-old George (Kline) wakes up in what's no better than a shotgun shack at the end of a cul-de-sac in a pricey coastal Orange County, Calif.
Rumbling his way on to Julian McGowan's evocative set, a so-called shotgun shack scarcely larger than Karl's (offstage) Cadillac, Hollis suggests a portly sage, his eyes glistening with experience and a hard-won wisdom.
You may yet find yourself in another part of the world, living in a shotgun shack, asking yourself, "What have I done?
But in his recent installation, entitled Spirit House, 1993, Birch set his sights on three African-American traditions of the rural South: the yard show, the shotgun shack, and the bottle tree.
Their world, beyond the razor-wire fences of the school, was no broader than the dusty streets of the wrong side of the tracks, the sloped tin roofs and sagging porches of shotgun shacks and trailers mounted on cinderblocks.
Urban renewal erased all that, with government bulldozers tearing down shotgun shacks and well-kept two-story homes alike.