References in classic literature ?
The shop was also patronized by mice--only the mice were rather afraid of Ginger.
(Tabitha Twitchit kept the only other shop in the village.
Passing through an intervening passage, she opened a door that communicated with the shop, just now so elaborately described.
"In my three shops here I have a hundred thousand rubles' worth of goods.
In the thoroughfares where shops abound, the sordid struggle with poverty shows itself unreservedly on the filthy pavement; gathers its forces through the week; and, strengthening to a tumult on Saturday night, sees the Sunday morning dawn in murky gaslight.
I bought the doll's house, and as they knew the lady's address (it was at this shop that I first learned her name) I instructed them to send it back to her with the following letter, which I wrote in the shop: "Dear madam, don't be ridiculous.
A short time after we had opened our shops, my eldest brother, one of these two dogs, resolved to travel in foreign countries for the sake of merchandise.
He'll never let it go." Then checking himself on the point of betraying too great an intimacy with Jacob's habits, he added "You watch him, while I run for the constable." And he hurried out of the shop.
'Sir, you know in your own conscience that I am not the person you look for, and that I was not in your shop before, therefore I demand that you detain me here no longer, or tell me the reason of your stopping me.' The fellow grew surlier upon this than before, and said he would do neither till he thought fit.
She knew to what shop we had been sent in Paris, and she now determined to purchase one of us, to bestow on the handkerchief selected some of her own beautiful needle work, to trim it with this lace, and, by the sale, to raise a sum sufficient for all her grandmother's earthly wants.
Sowerberry--the shop being shut up--were taking their supper in the little back-parlour, when Mr.
The lieutenant dismounted before a shop in the Rue des Lombards, at the sign of the Pilon d'Or.
Mr Verloc, going out in the morning, left his shop nominally in charge of his brother-in-law.
'The little counter being so short a counter that it leaves the fireplace, which would have been behind it if it had been longer, accessible, Mr Wegg sits down on a box in front of the fire, and inhales a warm and comfortable smell which is not the smell of the shop. 'For that,' Mr Wegg inwardly decides, as he takes a corrective sniff or two, 'is musty, leathery, feathery, cellary, gluey, gummy, and,' with another sniff, 'as it might be, strong of old pairs of bellows.'
Thus interrupted, Miss Jellyby became silent and walked moodily on at my side while I admired the long successions and varieties of streets, the quantity of people already going to and fro, the number of vehicles passing and repassing, the busy preparations in the setting forth of shop windows and the sweeping out of shops, and the extraordinary creatures in rags secretly groping among the swept-out rubbish for pins and other refuse.