shoo

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Related to shooing: shoping

be a shoo-in

To be predicted to easily win a competition. Julia is a shoo-in for this year's spelling bee—she's the best speller in the whole town.

shoo away

To drive someone or an animal away by or as if by crying "Shoo!" A noun or pronoun can be used between "shoo" and "away." The security guard shooed away the kids who were loitering near the entrance of the mall. I saw a deer eating the flowers in my garden, so I ran outside and shooed it away.
See also: away, shoo

shoo off

To drive someone or an animal away by or as if by crying "Shoo!" A noun or pronoun can be used between "shoo" and "off." The security guard shooed off the kids who were loitering near the entrance of the mall. I saw a deer eating the flowers in my garden, so I ran outside and shooed it off.
See also: off, shoo

shoo-in

Someone or something that is predicted to easily win a competition. Julia is a shoo-in for this year's spelling bee—she's the best speller in the whole town.
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

be a shoo-in

INFORMAL
If someone is a shoo-in for something such as an election or contest, they are certain to win. Note: `Shoo-in' is sometimes spelled `shoe-in'. The president seemed a shoo-in for a second term, even though the election was some 20 months away. She seemed like a shoo-in. But in the past month she has seen her 20-point lead reduced to a mere five percentage points.
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

be a ˈshoo-in

(American English, informal) be a person or team that will win easily or will definitely be chosen for something: He’s a shoo-in for governor.She was a shoo-in to win the award.
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

shoo-in

(ˈʃuɪn)
n. an easy winner. My horse was a shoo-in. It won by a mile.
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

shoo-in

A sure winner. This term comes from horse racing. The verb “to shoo” has long meant to drive or urge on. In the early 1900s corrupt jockeys would select a long shot to beat the faster horses, which would then be “shooed in” by the others. Turned into a noun, the expression now is used for a team, a political candidate, or other competitor, without any connotation of malfeasance.
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
"One minute we're playing punk music on the stage and the next we're shooing this cow away."
SWIM WITH A BADDY NO FOOL OR DRINK NO LARGE WATER BOYS MUST WEAR SLIM SUITS DIVE, ONLY IN JEEP WATER DECK SLIPPERY, DON'T RUB TAKE A FLOWER BEFORE SWIMMING NO DUNKING, PUSHING, OR SHOOING NO SWIMMING DURING THUNDERSTORE OBEY THE WIFEGUARDS
While the children were working, an elderly man with a white beard got out of his house and started shooing away the children, mumbling that they were a big nuisance and had destroyed all the plants.
Expanding the music into space by leaning into phrases or releasing them with the flick of a wrist, as if shooing away a bird, Regalado underlined a percussive piano line with gently rocking hips and tiny side steps.
After shooing the animals away, they called paramedics and the man, from Surrey, was rushed to hospital.