shine

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Related to shone: Shone syndrome, shone through

think the sun shines out (someone's) backside

To believe a person is better or more important than others or above reproach. (Note: If thought about oneself, it means that they are arrogant, conceited, or self-absorbed. If someone thinks this of another person, it means that they love or admire that person to such a degree as to be blind to any of their potential faults.) Tom has acted like he's such a hotshot after getting the promotion. He thinks the sun shines out his backside! He's absolutely head-over-heels in love with Mary. Even though I find her a bit irritating, he thinks the sun shines out her backside.
See also: backside, out, shine, sun, think

as if the sun shines out (someone's) backside

As though someone or oneself is better or more important than others. Various slang and vulgar synonyms for "backside" are often substituted. (Note: If thought about oneself, it means that they are arrogant, conceited, or self-absorbed. If someone thinks this of another person, it means that they love or admire that person to such a degree as to be blinded to any of their potential faults.) Samantha has such an ego and acts as if the sun shines out her backside. He's absolutely head-over-heels in love with Mary. Even though I find her a bit irritating, to him it's as if the sun shines out her backside.
See also: backside, if, out, shine, sun

knight in shining armor

A selfless, chivalrous man who helps a woman in distress. When the police officer pulled over to help the old woman change her flat tire, she hugged him and said he was her knight in shining armor.
See also: armor, knight, shine

come rain or shine

No matter what the weather is. Pack a poncho because the outdoor concert is happening come rain or shine.
See also: come, rain, shine

take a shine to (one)

To have or develop a fondness or preference for someone; to be attracted to or desire someone. It seems the boss has taken a shine to you, kid. You should start seeing some more work headed your way! I think Jennifer has taken a shine to my friend Tommy, so I'm going to try to set them up on a date!
See also: shine, take

shine a spotlight on (someone or something)

To focus on or bring attention to someone or something. The article shines a spotlight on the need for government investment in public utilities and infrastructure. We're trying to shine a spotlight on students who have made important contributions to the community.
See also: on, shine, spotlight

take the shine off

To make something less enjoyable, pleasant, or fun; to have a subduing or deadening effect on something. The foul weather really took the shine off our picnic yesterday.
See also: off, shine, take

think the sun shines out (of) (one's) arse

To believe a person is better or more important than others or above reproach. (Note: If thought about oneself, it means that he or she is arrogant, conceited, or self-absorbed. If someone thinks this of another person, it means that he or she loves or admires that person to such a degree as to be blind to any of their potential faults.) Tom has acted like he's such a hotshot after getting the promotion. He thinks the sun shines out his arse! He's absolutely head-over-heels in love with Mary. Even though I find her a bit irritating, he thinks the sun shines out her arse.
See also: arse, out, shine, sun, think

make hay while the sun shines

To take advantage of favorable conditions; to make the most of an opportunity when it is available. We finally have the full group assembled, so let's make hay while the sun shines and get this thing done. The skiing conditions won't be this good for another several months, so let's make hay while the sun shines.
See also: hay, make, shine, sun

come rain or shine

 and come rain or (come) shine
no matter whether it rains or the sun shines; in any sort of weather. (See also rain or shine.) Don't worry. I'll be there come rain or shine. We'll hold the picnic—rain or shine.
See also: come, rain, shine

from sea to shining sea

Fig. from coast to coast. (Taken from the lyrics of the song "America the Beautiful".) The new insect pest spread from sea to shining sea in a matter of months.
See also: sea, shine

Happy is the bride that the sun shines on.

Prov. It is supposed to be good luck for the sun to shine on a couple on their wedding day. Our wedding day was a sunny one, and most of my relatives made sure to remind me, "Happy is the bride that the sun shines on."
See also: bride, happy, on, shine, sun, that

Make hay while the sun shines.

Prov. If you have an opportunity to do something, do it before the opportunity expires. Jane: While my husband's out of town, I'm going to watch all the movies he wouldn't take me to see. Jane: Why not? Make hay while the sun shines.
See also: hay, make, shine, sun

rain or shine

no matter whether it rains or the sun shines. (See also come rain or shine.) Don't worry. I'll be there rain or shine. We'll hold the picnic—rain or shine.
See also: rain, shine

Rise and shine!

Fig. Get out of bed and be lively and energetic! (Often a command.) Come on, children! Rise and shine! We're going to the beach. Father always calls "Rise and shine!" in the morning when we want to go on sleeping.
See also: and, rise

shine up to someone

Fig. to try to gain someone's favor by being extra nice. John is a nice guy, except that he's always trying to shine up to the professor. Mary never tries to shine up to the manager.
See also: shine, up

take a fancy to someone or something

 and take a liking to someone or something; take a shine to someone or something
to develop a fondness or a preference for someone or something. John began to take a fancy to Sally late last August at the picnic. I've never taken a liking to cooked carrots. I think my teacher has taken a shine to me.
See also: fancy, take

where the sun don't shine

Sl. in a dark place, namely the anus. I don't care what you do with it. Just put it where the sun don't shine. For all I care you can shove it where the sun don't shine.
See also: shine, sun

knight in shining armor

A rescuer or defender, as in What this political party needs is a knight in shining armor to change its tarnished image . This metaphoric expression alludes to a medieval knight. [Mid-1900s]
See also: armor, knight, shine

make hay while the sun shines

Take advantage of favorable circumstances, as in Car sales have finally improved so we're making hay while the sun shines. This expression alludes to optimum dry weather for cutting grass. [Early 1500s]
See also: hay, make, shine, sun

rain or shine

No matter what the circumstances, as in We promised we would finish the project tomorrow, rain or shine. This term, first recorded in 1905, still refers to weather, as well as other uncertainty, and always implies that an activity will be carried out, no matter what. For a synonym, see hell or high water.
See also: rain, shine

rise and shine

An expression used when waking someone up, as in It's past seven, children-rise and shine! Originating as a military order in the late 1800s, shine here means "act lively, do well."
See also: and, rise, shine

shine up to

Try to impress or please, be attentive to, as in George was always shining up to the teacher, or Her father warned her about men shining up to her for her money. [Colloquial; late 1800s]
See also: shine, up

take a fancy to

Also, take a liking or shine to . Be attracted to someone or something, as in They took a fancy to spicy foods after their Mexican vacation, or I'm hoping he'll take a liking to the water, now that we have a cottage on a lake, or We think Bill's taken a shine to Betsy. The first term was first recorded in 1541, the first variant in 1570, and the last, a colloquialism, in 1850.
See also: fancy, take

make hay while the sun shines

If you make hay while the sun shines, you take advantage of a good situation which is not likely to last. With house prices at an all-time high, both property developers are making hay while the sun shines. You've got to make hay while the sun shines — and it doesn't shine long in a sporting life. Note: You can also just say that someone makes hay. The New Zealand media made hay with the issue.
See also: hay, make, shine, sun

a knight in shining armour

If you describe a man as a knight in shining armour, you mean that he has rescued you from a difficult situation, often in a kind and brave way. Note: `Armour' is spelled `armor' in American English. I just felt dizzy and then I collapsed. The next thing I woke up in hospital. I am very, very grateful to Tom and I always will be — he really was my knight in shining armour. She found a surprising knight in shining armor in her company's attorney, who rode in to save her job, rescue her love life and give her a place to live. Note: In stories written or set in the Middle Ages, a knight in shining armour traditionally came to the rescue of a `damsel (= young woman) in distress'.
See also: armour, knight, shine

rain or shine

or

come rain or shine

If someone does something rain or shine or come rain or shine, they always do it, even when the weather is bad or other conditions make it difficult. He plays golf, come rain or shine, every Monday. She runs six miles every morning, rain or shine.
See also: rain, shine

take a shine to someone

BRITISH, INFORMAL
If you take a shine to someone, you like them when you first meet them, often in a romantic way. Jack took a shine to one of Molly's pretty cousins. Laura took a shine to her and immediately offered her the job.
See also: shine, take

take the shine off something

mainly BRITISH
If something takes the shine off a pleasant event or achievement, it makes it less enjoyable than it should be. Sadly, the behaviour of a small group of fans took the shine off what was otherwise a great match. The row now threatens to take the shine off the party's recent triumph in the local elections.
See also: off, shine, something, take

Rise and shine!

exclam. Get up and get going! Get up! Rise and shine! It’s late.
See also: and, rise

shine someone

tv. to insult someone; to deceive someone. Stop shining me. I’m cool, man, ice.
See also: shine

shined

mod. alcohol intoxicated, especially by moonshine. Tipsy? He’s shined from dawn to dusk.
See also: shine

where the sun don’t shine

in. in a dark place, namely the anus. (Often with put it or shove it. Part of the answer to the question Where shall I put it? Always with don’t; never with doesn’t.) For all I care you can shove it where the sun don’t shine.
See also: shine, sun

shine up to

Informal
To try to impress or please: shined up to the boss, hoping to get a raise.
See also: shine, up

take a shine to

Informal
To like spontaneously.
See also: shine, take

knight in shining armor

A wonderful guy. Fairy tales chronicled fair maidens in distress who were rescued at the last minute from dragons and ogres by a gallant knight in gleaming armor, where-upon they all lived happily ever after. Even if a young woman didn't view herself as a princess or consider herself in desperate straits, she still imagined herself being carried off by the man of her dreams, Prince Charming, a knight in shining armor.
See also: armor, knight, shine
References in periodicals archive ?
Shone, 55, was jailed for at least 16 years yesterday as Mary's relatives watched from the public benches.
Andrew and Mary's sister Christine Keegan, 42, were in court to see sentence passed on brutal Shone, who was found guilty by a jury at the High Court in Glasgow last month.
Shone killed Mary after a row at their home in Lochwinnoch, Renfrewshire.
Officers in the helicopter identified the address where the light had been shone from and later a 54-year-old man was arrested on suspicion of endangering an aircraft.
It follows a separate incident in South Tyneside on Tuesday night when police received a report that a laser light had been shone at a flight which was approaching Newcastle International Airport.
Shortly afterwards, a second call was received about a laser pen being shone in the area.
Nathan Barry Griffiths, 23, was "guilty of being stupid", when he shone the laser into the night sky, magistrates said yesterday.
A laser pen that owned Another man had also shone the pen, the court heard.
Prosecuting, John Wylde said in an interview Griffiths accepted he had shone the light into the night sky and had heard the helicopter.
Shone, 55, is charged with stabbing mum-of-four Mary Craig to death at their home in Lochwinnoch, Renfrewshire, in May.
The jury heard Shone had been detained for assaulting the 43-year-old but was later told she had died.
The German shepherd,Tara, was up on its hind legs and was thrust at Mr Shone following a dispute over a sign Mr Shone had erected in a hedge between their properties.
Mr Shone put his hand up to protect himself and was bitten on the arm, receiving five puncture marks.
Mr Shone and Miss McCloud's argument spilled out into the road and into a park -and Houghton followed in his taxi.
But as they returned,it was alleged that Houghton deliberately ran Mr Shone down.