shoe is on the other foot

the shoe is on the other foot

The roles (of two or more people) have been reversed, especially roles that were the opposite of each other. I can see that you don't like being told what to do, but now the shoe is on the other foot!
See also: foot, on, other, shoe

shoe is on the other foot

Prov. One is experiencing the same (often bad) things that one caused another person to experience. (Note the variations in the examples.) The teacher is taking a course in summer school and is finding out what it's like when the shoe is on the other foot. When the policeman was arrested, he learned what it was like to have the shoe on the other foot.
See also: foot, on, other, shoe

shoe is on the other foot, the

Circumstances have changed, and you and I have changed places. This saying began life as the boot is on the other leg, appearing in print in the mid-nineteenth century. Putting the left shoe on the right foot would, of course, entail considerable discomfort, a meaning retained in the metaphor, which implies “See how you like being in my place.” Winston Churchill used it in My African Journal (1908): “Here . . . the boot is on the other leg, and Civilization is ashamed of her arrangements in the presence of a savage.”
See also: on, other, shoe
References in periodicals archive ?
(When the shoe is on the other foot, I tend to slink off into the night.) People who stutter know they make people nervous.