shlemiel

(redirected from shlemiels)

schlemiel

slang A bumbling, inept, incompetent person; someone who always tends to fail or do things wrong. From Yiddish. What a bunch of schlemiels! First they get my order wrong, then they send it to the wrong address, and now they're trying to refund me the wrong amount of money! Jeff is managing the project? That schlemiel couldn't manage his own sock drawer.

shlemiel

slang A bumbling, inept, incompetent person; someone who always tends to fail or do things wrong. From Yiddish. What a bunch of shlemiels! First they get my order wrong, then they send it to the wrong address, and now they're trying to refund me the wrong amount of money! Jeff is managing the project? That shlemiel couldn't manage his own sock drawer.

schlemiel

and schlemihl and shlemiel (ʃləˈmil)
n. a gullible person; a loser. (From Hebrew Shelumiel via Yiddish.) See if you can get that schlemiel to buy the Brooklyn Bridge.

shlemiel

verb
References in periodicals archive ?
Hundreds, if not thousands, of writers began fuming out work in just this mode--which now seems as quintessentially "eighties" as black humor involving picaresque shlemiels was "sixties." Just why this happened remains for literary archeologists to determine.
American Jews like Philip Roth, Morris Dickstein, Leonard Michaels and Woody Allen placed Kafkaesque comedy in an Eastern European Jewish tradition, the "low" comedy o shlemiels, shlimazls, luftmenshen an other chronic victims of power.
He showed that although Kafka described himself as a helpless shlemiel on the job, in fact he was a superachiever: He used bureaucratic procedures to transform the Czech system of workmen's compensation into a system of accident prevention; he learned how mines and factories worked from the inside, fought the bosses, forced big changes, helped save thousands of workers' lives; he was probably the inventor of OSHA, and one of the most creative bureaucrats of the century.
When Grossman reintroduces Sholem Aleichem's Mod the Cantor's Son as Momik's companion, he is reintroducing the shtetl as venue for the Hebrew narrative, Jewish humor as its vehicle, and the shlemiel as its hero.
There has been a reintroduction of shlemiel literature into the Hebrew province, and through his bloodshot, bespectacled eyes, we can see how Zionism's utopian vision has capitulated to a more syncretic panorama.
The predominant form of Israeli humor during its first five decades was satire, the counterpart and foil of shlemiel literature and the most scathing response to an imperfect fit between dream and reality.