red sky at night, shepherd's delight

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red sky at night, shepherd's delight

A red sky at sunset is a sign that good weather will follow. The full phrase is "Red sky at night, shepherd's delight; red sky in the morning, shepherd's warning." I think we're going to have a nice sunny day tomorrow. Look at that sunset—red sky at night, shepherd's delight.
See also: delight, red, sky
References in periodicals archive ?
WE'VE all heard the saying "red sky at night, shepherd's delight" - but how true is it, and does it explain why the skies across Wales were so amazingly red on Tuesday evening?
It was the best, best Christmas gift for her family, reminding all who love happy endings of the story of the return of the prodigal son and the shepherd's delight at finding one lost sheep.
Weather throughout the day did much to raise spirits of the enthusiastic festival-goers; it was Shepherd's Delight by evening, promising much of the same for today's music fans.
In a similar way that the old saying of "Red sky at night, shepherd's delight. Red sky in the morning, shepherd's warning" is used at sunrise and sunset to indicate the changing weather, a red sky on the brown dwarf suggests an atmosphere loaded with dust and moisture particles.
And is there any truth in the old adage 'red sky at night, shepherd's delight'?
| SHEPHERD'S DELIGHT: The red sky captured by our photographer Julian Hughes (main picture) and (inset) similar pictures by Town fans Steve Cheesbrough (left) and Mark Brereton (JH301113Esky)
So was a schoolgirl experiment which proved the accuracy of that well-known saying Red Sky at Night, Shepherd's Delight. But then we had a somewhat podgy Michael Fish.
They could be right about Redknapp but Far Post believes there may be an absence of Shepherd's delight.
There is more than a hint of truth in the rhyme which continues, 'Shepherd's delight'.
Nonetheless, one day when he was working a night shift as a forecaster and had masses of confusing data coming in, he fell back on the adage: "Red sky at night, shepherd's delight" - and got it right.
Favourites like, "red sky at night shepherd's delight, red sky in the morning sailor's warning", have been in use so long it was even espoused by Jesus in Matthew 16.
Does the saying "Red sky at night, shepherd's delight, red sky in the morning shepherd's warning," hold any weight?