References in classic literature ?
When they sat down on the grass with Captain curled at their feet, Soot solemnly listening on a tree and Nut and Shell nosing about close to them, it seemed to Mary that it would be scarcely bearable to leave such delightfulness, but when she began to tell her story somehow the look in Dickon's funny face gradually changed her mind.
It was hard to go away and leave it all, particularly as Nut had actually crept on to her dress and Shell had scrambled down the trunk of the apple-tree they sat under and stayed there looking at her with inquiring eyes.
"You are not afraid of the German shells, then?" he asked.
We got some shells yesterday dropped within a quarter of a mile of us.
After a whole day spent in this employment, he would return about nightfall with several cocoanut shells filled with different descriptions of kelp.
The smoking shell spun like a top between him and the prostrate adjutant, near a wormwood plant between the field and the meadow.
From in front and especially from the right, in the unlifting smoke the guns boomed, and out of the mysterious domain of smoke that overlay the whole space in front, quick hissing cannon balls and slow whistling shells flew unceasingly.
Nalasu crouched closer when the shell burst beyond, and Jerry snarled and rippled his hair afresh.
Jerry had just gained the doorway when the shell exploded.
Yet all this gravel has been transported, and probably rounded, subsequently to the deposition of the white beds, and long subsequently to the underlying beds with the tertiary shells.
"How can I tell where the next shell will fall?" Mercy answered, quietly.
Within this shell were shut up a large cat, and a squirrel belonging to J.
For a quarter of an hour I trod on this sand, sown with the impalpable dust of shells. The hull of the Nautilus, resembling a long shoal, disappeared by degrees; but its lantern, when darkness should overtake us in the waters, would help to guide us on board by its distinct rays.
It occurred to me that land-shells, when hybernating and having a membranous diaphragm over the mouth of the shell, might be floated in chinks of drifted timber across moderately wide arms of the sea.
In one place, five hundred feet above the sea, the perpendicular bank on the upper side of the road was ten or fifteen feet high, and the cut exposed three veins of oyster shells, just as we have seen quartz veins exposed in the cutting of a road in Nevada or Montana.