share


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to share: thesaurus, dictionary

a problem shared is a problem halved

Talking about a problem with someone else usually makes it seem less daunting or troubling. Just tell me what's bothering you, honey. You know what they say—a problem shared is a problem halved.
See also: halve, problem, share

do (one's) share

To contribute work to that of others in a group. If you don't do your share with the slides, our presentation will never be finished on time. We haven't asked you to do anything extra. Just do your share.
See also: share

have (one's) share of (something)

To have a sufficient amount of something. That little girl is just eight years old, and she's already had her share of hardship, unfortunately. Don't worry, you'll each have your share of the cake.
See also: have, of, share

have had more than (one's) fair share of (something)

Has endured more unpleasant things than other people, especially when such trials are undeserved. That poor girl has had more than her fair share of trauma in her short life.
See also: fair, have, more, of, share

share and share alike

To take or distribute equal portions or shares of something. When he won the lottery, Dan gave part of the money to every family in the neighborhood. "Share and share alike," he said. Come on, kids, there are enough toys for everyone to play with. Share and share alike!
See also: alike, and, share

the lion's share

The largest part or portion of something. The lion's share of the credit must go to our development team, who have worked tirelessly to bring this product to market before the holiday season. Even though we're all talented, it's always our youngest brother who gets the lion's share of our parents' praise and attention.
See also: share

(one's) fair share (of something)

All that one deserves, expects, or is entitled to, whether that be a good or a bad thing. Usually preceded by "more than" to indicate an excessive amount. Leave the rest for the others, you've had your fair share. That poor girl has had to endure more than her fair share of trauma at such a young age.
See also: fair, share

a trouble shared is a trouble halved

By discussing one's problem, or seeking someone's help with that problem, the situation will not be as difficult, distressing, or daunting. A: "I've just had a lot on my plate recently, but I don't want to be a downer." B: "Hey, a trouble shared is a trouble halved. Tell me what's up, and maybe I'll be able to help."
See also: halve, share, trouble

go shares

To be equally involved in something; to work together. You can't do all of this work on your own—why don't we go shares?
See also: go, share

share in (something)

To take part in or a portion of something alongside one or more other people. If everyone shares in the work, we'll be finished cleaning the house in an hour or two. We all help pay for the lottery tickets, so we all get to share in the winnings equally.
See also: share

share (one's) pain

1. To commiserate with one about the same negative experience. A: "I lost nearly everything during the economic crash." B: "I share your pain. I had to shutter the business my great-grandfather built because of the crash." I'm going down to the bar with the other laid-off workers to share their pain.
2. To relate one's negative experience or feelings to someone else. You should keep all that sadness and anger bottled up inside. It's important to share your pain with someone who can help you learn how to cope with it. It was nearly a year after her father died that Sarah finally shared her pain with me.
See also: pain, share

share (one's) sorrow

1. To commiserate with one about the same or similar loss, disappointment, or misfortune. A: "I lost nearly everything during the economic crash." B: "I share your sorrow. I had to shutter the business my great-grandfather built because of the crash." We're going down to the bar with the other laid-off workers to share their sorrow.
2. To relate one's loss, disappointment, misfortune, or the source thereof to someone else. You should keep all that grief bottled up inside. It's important to share your sorrow with someone who can help you learn how to cope with it. It was nearly a year after her father died that Sarah finally shared her sorrow with me.
See also: share, sorrow

thanks for sharing

1. A polite expression said after someone has shared something personal or intimate with a group of people. That was a really lovely poem, Bobby. Thanks for sharing. Thanks for sharing with us, Sarah. I know it can be hard to talk about our grief, but it's an important part of healing.
2. A sarcastic expression said after someone has shared some information that is really disgusting, unpleasant, uncomfortable, irritating, etc. A: "Wow, I had the worst diarrhea of my life just now." B: "Wow, thanks for sharing, Tom."
See also: share, thanks

thank you for sharing

1. A polite expression said after someone has shared something personal or intimate with a group of people. That was a really lovely poem, Bobby. Thank you for sharing. Thank you for sharing with us, Sarah. I know it can be hard to talk about our grief, but it's an important part of healing.
2. A sarcastic expression said after someone has shared some information that is especially unpleasant or unwelcome. A: "Wow, I had the worst diarrhea of my life just now." B: "Wow, thank you for sharing, Tom."
See also: share, thank

lion's share of something

Fig. the largest portion of something. I earn a lot, but the lion's share goes for taxes. The lion's share of the surplus cheese goes to school cafeterias.
See also: of, share

one's fair share

the amount of something that one is due relative to what other people are receiving. Let him take more. He didn't get his fair share. I want my fair share. You cheated me! Give me some more!
See also: fair, share

share and share alike

Cliché having or taking equal shares. I kept five and gave the other five to Maryshare and share alike. The two roommates agreed that they would divide expensesshare and share alike.
See also: alike, and, share

share someone's pain

to understand and sympathize with someone's pain or emotional discomfort. (Said in order to sound sympathetic.) I am sorry about the loss of your home. I share your pain. We sympathize about the loss of your mother. We share your pain.
See also: pain, share

share someone's sorrow

to grieve as someone else grieves. We all share your sorrow on this sad, sad day. I am sorry to hear about the death in your family. I share your sorrow.
See also: share, sorrow

Thank you for sharing.

Inf. a sarcastic remark made when someone tells something that is unpleasant, overly personal, disgusting, or otherwise annoying. Thank you for sharing. I really need to hear about your operation. Thank you for sharing, Bob. I hope your parents' divorce goes well.
See also: share, thank

trouble shared is a trouble halved

Prov. If you tell someone about a problem you are having, or request someone's help with a problem, the problem will not seem so daunting. (Can be used to encourage someone to confide in you or ask for your help.) Jill: Is something wrong? You've seemed so depressed lately. Jane: Oh, I wouldn'twant to bother you with it. Jill: Don't be silly. A trouble shared is a trouble halved, remember.
See also: halve, share, trouble

lion's share

The greater part or most of something, as in Whenever they won a doubles match, Ethel claimed the lion's share of the credit, or As usual, Uncle Bob took the lion's share of the cake. This expression alludes to Aesop's fable about a lion, who got all of a kill because its fellow hunters, an ass, fox, and wolf, were afraid to claim their share. [Late 1700s]
See also: share

share and share alike

Mete out or partake of something equally, as in Mom told the children to share and share alike with their Halloween candy. This term, first recorded about 1566, alluded to the equal apportioning of spoils and soon was broadened to include equal sharing in the costs of a venture and other undertakings or possessions.
See also: alike, and, share

the lion's share

COMMON If you get the lion's share of something, you get the largest part of it. Their athletes won the lion's share of the medals. While Gladys was given the lion's share of their mother's attention, Mary and her two younger brothers enjoyed their freedom. Note: This refers to Aesop's fable `The Lion and his Fellow Hunters', in which a lion goes hunting with several other animals and takes everything that they catch for himself, instead of sharing it with them.
See also: share

the lion's share

the largest part of something.
1998 Times Rich countries generally seize the lion's share of trade.
See also: share

share and share alike

have or receive an equal share; share things equally.
See also: alike, and, share

a share/slice of the ˈcake

(British English) (American English a piece/share/slice of the ˈpie) a share of the benefits or profits: Third-world countries are discovering how their natural resources have been exploited by the rest of the world and now they want a bigger slice of the cake.
See also: cake, of, share, slice

(more than) your fair ˈshare of something

(more than) the usual, expected or desired amount of something: I’ve had more than my fair share of problems recently, but now things seem to be getting better again.We’ve all paid our fair share except Delia, who’s never got any money.
See also: fair, of, share, something

the ˈlion’s share (of something)

(British English) the largest part of something that is being shared: The lion’s share of the awards have gone to American stars again.This idiom comes from one of Aesop’s fables. The lion is helped by other animals to kill a stag, but then refuses to share it with them.
See also: share

share and share aˈlike

(saying) share things equally: Children must learn to share and share alike.
See also: alike, and, share

a trouble ˌshared is a trouble ˈhalved

(saying) if you talk to somebody about your problems and worries, instead of keeping them to yourself, they seem less serious: You really should tell someone how you feel. After all, a trouble shared is a trouble halved.
See also: halve, share, trouble

share in

v.
To have a share or part in something: When the company began to make money, everyone working there shared in the profits.
See also: share

lion’s share

n. the largest portion. I earn a lot, but the lion’s share goes for taxes.
See also: share

lion's share

The greatest or best part.
See also: share

go shares

To be concerned or partake equally or jointly, as in a business venture.
See also: go, share
References in periodicals archive ?
2003-7 involved a VPF with standard commercial terms similar to the VPF described above, with one notable exception: the counterparty in the ruling did not have the right to borrow the underlying shares pledged by the counterparty.
The cluster enhancements to the VERITAS Volume Manager enable multiple nodes in a cluster to share disk groups across the cluster.
When taxpayers compute and report these gains or losses, the IRS allows a choice of four alternative methods for determining the basis of the shares sold, each of which may affect the amount and character of the gain or loss recognized.
Finally, Part V discusses the potential additional benefit of providing in the option plan for the use of previously acquired shares of employer stock to pay the exercise price under an ISO, and explores other means of facilitating the exercise of ISOs by employees.
SOP 93-6 requires you to measure compensation based on the fair value of the ESOP shares committed to be released rather than the cost of the shares to the ESOP.
Stock subscriptions that are partially paid and do not share in dividends until fully paid are treated like warrants and included in diluted EPS using the treasury stock method, discussed later.
The 4,000 new shares will have a basis of $30,000 (the cash paid to exercise the option) and a new holding period beginning on the day the option was exercised.
STOCK PORTFOLIO: Chromavision Med 2,644 shares, NTOP 2,070 shares.
As debt is repaid, shares are released from a suspense account and must be allocated to individual participant accounts by the end of the ESOP's fiscal year.