Shank

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by shank's mare

By one's legs and feet, used for walking; traveling by foot. A reference to the shank—the lower leg between the knee and the ankle—and the use of ponies or horses for travel. (Also written as "shanks' mare.") My bicycle fell apart three miles away from home, so I had to go the rest of the way by shank's mare. Unfortunately, with the sedentary lifestyle many lead today, travel by shank's mare has largely become obsolete.
See also: by, mare

on shank's pony

On foot; walking. Also seen as "on shanks' pony" or "on shanks's pony." A reference to the shank—the lower leg between the knee and the ankle—and the historical use of ponies or horses for travel. My bicycle fell apart three miles away from home, so I had to go the rest of the way on shank's pony. Unfortunately, with the sedentary lifestyle many lead today, fewer and fewer people go anywhere on shanks' pony.
See also: on, pony

ride shanks' mare

To walk. "Shanks" refers to one's legs. The store is close enough that we don't need to drive, we can just ride shanks' mare.
See also: mare, ride

shank

1. noun, slang A homemade or makeshift cutting or stabbing weapon, especially one fashioned in prison. He was sentenced to a further 15 years for murdering another prisoner with a shank fashioned from a razor blade and a toothbrush. I always kept a shank hidden in my cell in case anyone tried to order a hit on me from the outside.
2. verb, slang To stab or cut (someone) with such a weapon. She said she was going to shank the new inmate for her allegiance to the rival gang. I got shanked during the prison riot, but thankfully it didn't do any serious damage.

shank it

1. To travel (to some place) on foot. The front tire of my bicycle was totally smashed, so I had to shank it all the way back home.
2. In golf, to strike the ball with the very back of the club rather than its face, causing the ball to veer off in the wrong direction at a sharp angle. He had set himself up to win the tournament, but when he shanked it on the last hole, he new his chance was gone.
3. By extension, to cause any ball to travel in the wrong direction as a result of a misplaced kick or strike. It should have been an easy field goal, but I saw the defensive player rushing toward me and I ended up shanking it to the right of the goal post.
See also: shank

shank's mare

One's legs and feet, used for walking; travel by foot. A reference to the shank— the lower leg between the knee and the ankle—and the use of ponies or horses for travel. (Also seen as "shanks' mare.") My bicycle fell apart three miles away from home, so I had to use shank's mare to go the rest of the way. Unfortunately, with the sedentary lifestyle many lead today, shank's mare has largely become an obsolete mode of travel.
See also: mare

shank's nag

One's legs and feet, used for walking; travel by foot. Also "shanks' nag." A reference to the shank— the lower leg between the knee and the ankle—and the use of ponies or horses for travel. My bicycle fell apart three miles away from home, so I had to use shank's nag to go the rest of the way. Unfortunately, with the sedentary lifestyle many lead today, shank's nag has largely become an obsolete mode of travel.
See also: nag

shank's pony

One's legs and feet, used for walking; travel by foot. Also "shanks' pony." A reference to the shank—the lower leg between the knee and the ankle—and the use of ponies or horses for travel. My bicycle fell apart three miles away from home, so I had to use shank's pony to go the rest of the way. Unfortunately, with the sedentary lifestyle many lead today, shank's pony has largely become an obsolete mode of travel.
See also: pony

the shank of the evening

colloquial, dated The origin and precise meaning of the phrase is not certain, hence the contradictory nature of the definitions.
1. The latter part of the evening, between sunset and dark; dusk. Well, it's getting to be the shank of the evening. I should probably start heading home before it gets too dark out.
2. The early or main portion of the evening. There's plenty of time to get this done—we still have the shank of the evening ahead of us.
3. The best or more exciting part of something, especially a party, held in the evening. A: "Hey, you can't leave now! It's only the shank of the evening!" B: "I know things are just getting good here, but I have to be up early tomorrow!"
See also: evening, of, shank
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

by shank's mare

Fig. by foot; by walking. (Shank refers to the shank of the leg.) My car isn't working, so I'll have to travel by shank's mare. I'm sore because I've been getting around by shank's mare.
See also: by, mare

shank it

Sl. to use one's legs to get somewhere; to walk. My car needs fixing so I had to shank it to work today. I like to shank it every now and then.
See also: shank

shank's mare

Fig. travel on foot. You'll find that shank's mare is the quickest way to get across town. Is there a bus, or do I have to use shank's mare?
See also: mare
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

on Shanks's pony

using your own legs as a means of transport.
Shanks (from the Old English word sceanca , ‘leg bone’) is now used as an informal term for ‘legs’. The original form of the expression was on Shanks's mare .
See also: on, pony
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

(on) Shanks’s ˈpony

(British English, informal) walking, rather than travelling by car, bus, etc.; on foot: ‘How are we going to get there?’ ‘I suppose it’ll have to be Shanks’s pony.’You young people go everywhere by car these days. When I was young all we had was Shanks’s pony.
Shanks is an informal word for your legs.
See also: pony
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

shank

1. n. a knife; a homemade knife. (Possibly named for a bone handle.) The mugger pulled a shank on the victim.
2. in. to dance. (This shank refers to a leg bone.) They were busy shankin’ and didn’t hear the gunshots.

shank it

tv. to use one’s legs to get somewhere; to walk. My car needs fixing so I had to shank it to work today.
See also: shank

shank’s mare

n. foot travel. (Old. Lacking a horse, one uses the legs. This does not refer to a person named shank.) You’ll find that shank’s mare is the quickest way to get across town.
See also: mare
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

shank of the evening

Twilight, dusk. This expression uses shank in the sense of “latter part of ” or “end of,” a usage rare except in this phrase. The earliest citation in the OED is from 1828. P. G. Wodehouse used it in Pearls, Girls, and Monty Bodkin (1972), “‘It’s very late.’—‘Shank of the evening.’”
See also: evening, of, shank

shank's mare

On foot, walking. This quaint expression dates from the second half of the eighteenth century, the shank here alluding to the leg. Also put as to ride shank’s mare, it continues to be used, although it may be heard less often. The Cleveland Plain Dealer had it (Oct. 26, 1974): “The people who came to the Barons-Rangers game that night long ago came by streetcar and bus and by shank’s mare as well as by auto.”
See also: mare
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer

shank's mare

Walking. “Shank” is another word for shinbone. By extension, its use in the phase refers to our legs. “Mare” here is equine transport, and when we walk, we “ride” on shank's mare.
See also: mare
Endangered Phrases by Steven D. Price Copyright © 2011 by Steven D. Price
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References in periodicals archive ?
At the Leeds hearing, Shanks was convicted of possessing a firearm with intent to endanger life.
Now the `green' revolution is turning rubbish into riches for Shanks. It has 14 sites in the UK and is expanding in Belgium.
Shanks was arrested in a phone box in Glasgow after a tip-off by his brother on Friday night.
Bake shanks in a 400 |degrees~ oven for 45 minutes.
Asking about the time Shanks joined the business support unit in 2009, Findlay said: "How much in debt was Rangers Football Club?" Shanks said: "I think it was about PS33million."
INGREDIENTS 3 tablespoons vegetable 4 venison shanks 4 heads of garlic, peeled Salt 3/4 cup white wine 1/2 cup chicken stock Zest of a lemon 2 tablespoons unsalted butter 1 teaspoon dried thyme 1 tablespoon chopped fresh rosemary, plus more for garnish
Quarter-finals: Mark Burdett & Karl Shanks 21 Steve Reed & Dave Ensor 9, Les & Ken Haylor 21 Leigh Burdett & Ted Millener 19, Colin Richards & John Hatzer 21 Jim Robertson & Jamie Dunn 15, Darren Tring & Shane Day 21 Andy Parker and Alan Chetwynd 14.
The move values the Milton Keynes-based firm at pounds 536m, but Shanks said that a cash offer of 150p a share - or pounds 595m - would "deliver an appropriate value to shareholders".
WASTE management company Shanks today said it had received a takeover approach worth around pounds 536m.
LAW firm Ward Hadaway has helped to complete a fourth major deal for leading European waste management plc Shanks Group.
Jacqueline Simpson ran the hot tap for three minutes and then walked out leaving James Shanks, 67, helpless.
"Diners are always looking for heart-warming dishes at this time of year and lamb shanks with a rosemary seasoning and a red wine sauce are perfect comfort food," says Rob.
Shanks, 50, passed away January 2, 2008 at home after a long, courageous battle with leukemia.
Construction boss Raymond Thomas Shanks received pounds 948,514 after being diagnosed with a rare form of cancer and given 18 months to live.