shank


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shank's nag

One's legs and feet, used for walking; travel by foot. Also "shanks' nag." A reference to the shank— the lower leg between the knee and the ankle—and the use of ponies or horses for travel. My bicycle fell apart three miles away from home, so I had to use shank's nag to go the rest of the way. Unfortunately, with the sedentary lifestyle many lead today, shank's nag has largely become an obsolete mode of travel.
See also: nag

shank's pony

One's legs and feet, used for walking; travel by foot. Also "shanks' pony." A reference to the shank—the lower leg between the knee and the ankle—and the use of ponies or horses for travel. My bicycle fell apart three miles away from home, so I had to use shank's pony to go the rest of the way. Unfortunately, with the sedentary lifestyle many lead today, shank's pony has largely become an obsolete mode of travel.
See also: pony

ride shanks' mare

To walk. "Shanks" refers to one's legs. The store is close enough that we don't need to drive, we can just ride shanks' mare.
See also: mare, ride

by shank's mare

By one's legs and feet, used for walking; traveling by foot. A reference to the shank—the lower leg between the knee and the ankle—and the use of ponies or horses for travel. (Also written as "shanks' mare.") My bicycle fell apart three miles away from home, so I had to go the rest of the way by shank's mare. Unfortunately, with the sedentary lifestyle many lead today, travel by shank's mare has largely become obsolete.
See also: by, mare

shank's mare

One's legs and feet, used for walking; travel by foot. A reference to the shank— the lower leg between the knee and the ankle—and the use of ponies or horses for travel. (Also seen as "shanks' mare.") My bicycle fell apart three miles away from home, so I had to use shank's mare to go the rest of the way. Unfortunately, with the sedentary lifestyle many lead today, shank's mare has largely become an obsolete mode of travel.
See also: mare

on shank's pony

On foot; walking. Also seen as "on shanks' pony" or "on shanks's pony." A reference to the shank—the lower leg between the knee and the ankle—and the historical use of ponies or horses for travel. My bicycle fell apart three miles away from home, so I had to go the rest of the way on shank's pony. Unfortunately, with the sedentary lifestyle many lead today, fewer and fewer people go anywhere on shanks' pony.
See also: on, pony

shank it

1. To travel (to some place) on foot. The front tire of my bicycle was totally smashed, so I had to shank it all the way back home.
2. In golf, to strike the ball with the very back of the club rather than its face, causing the ball to veer off in the wrong direction at a sharp angle. He had set himself up to win the tournament, but when he shanked it on the last hole, he new his chance was gone.
3. By extension, to cause any ball to travel in the wrong direction as a result of a misplaced kick or strike. It should have been an easy field goal, but I saw the defensive player rushing toward me and I ended up shanking it to the right of the goal post.
See also: shank

shank

1. noun, slang A homemade or makeshift cutting or stabbing weapon, especially one fashioned in prison. He was sentenced to a further 15 years for murdering another prisoner with a shank fashioned from a razor blade and a toothbrush. I always kept a shank hidden in my cell in case anyone tried to order a hit on me from the outside.
2. verb, slang To stab or cut (someone) with such a weapon. She said she was going to shank the new inmate for her allegiance to the rival gang. I got shanked during the prison riot, but thankfully it didn't do any serious damage.

by shank's mare

Fig. by foot; by walking. (Shank refers to the shank of the leg.) My car isn't working, so I'll have to travel by shank's mare. I'm sore because I've been getting around by shank's mare.
See also: by, mare

shank it

Sl. to use one's legs to get somewhere; to walk. My car needs fixing so I had to shank it to work today. I like to shank it every now and then.
See also: shank

shank's mare

Fig. travel on foot. You'll find that shank's mare is the quickest way to get across town. Is there a bus, or do I have to use shank's mare?
See also: mare

on Shanks's pony

using your own legs as a means of transport.
Shanks (from the Old English word sceanca , ‘leg bone’) is now used as an informal term for ‘legs’. The original form of the expression was on Shanks's mare .
See also: on, pony

(on) Shanks’s ˈpony

(British English, informal) walking, rather than travelling by car, bus, etc.; on foot: ‘How are we going to get there?’ ‘I suppose it’ll have to be Shanks’s pony.’You young people go everywhere by car these days. When I was young all we had was Shanks’s pony.
Shanks is an informal word for your legs.
See also: pony

shank

1. n. a knife; a homemade knife. (Possibly named for a bone handle.) The mugger pulled a shank on the victim.
2. in. to dance. (This shank refers to a leg bone.) They were busy shankin’ and didn’t hear the gunshots.

shank it

tv. to use one’s legs to get somewhere; to walk. My car needs fixing so I had to shank it to work today.
See also: shank

shank’s mare

n. foot travel. (Old. Lacking a horse, one uses the legs. This does not refer to a person named shank.) You’ll find that shank’s mare is the quickest way to get across town.
See also: mare

shank of the evening

Twilight, dusk. This expression uses shank in the sense of “latter part of ” or “end of,” a usage rare except in this phrase. The earliest citation in the OED is from 1828. P. G. Wodehouse used it in Pearls, Girls, and Monty Bodkin (1972), “‘It’s very late.’—‘Shank of the evening.’”
See also: evening, of, shank

shank's mare

On foot, walking. This quaint expression dates from the second half of the eighteenth century, the shank here alluding to the leg. Also put as to ride shank’s mare, it continues to be used, although it may be heard less often. The Cleveland Plain Dealer had it (Oct. 26, 1974): “The people who came to the Barons-Rangers game that night long ago came by streetcar and bus and by shank’s mare as well as by auto.”
See also: mare

shank's mare

Walking. “Shank” is another word for shinbone. By extension, its use in the phase refers to our legs. “Mare” here is equine transport, and when we walk, we “ride” on shank's mare.
See also: mare
References in periodicals archive ?
I know you're eager to know how to breed a feathered shank but remember you can't quote me on this because I couldn't get an expert poultry breeder to verify.
The weekly body weight (BW, g), left and right shank length (SHL, mm), shank width (SHW, mm), wing length (WL, mm), face width (FW, mm) and face length (FL, mm) of the same birds from each group were weekly measured from 7th to 42th days of age using a digital caliper.
At times it seems disingenuous (as when Mennonites show themselves ready to work freely with conciliar Protestants, but avoid evangelicals); but in Shank's own practice he held this position creatively and helpfully.
Reduce heat, return shanks to skillet and cover with
The split sole increases flexibility while the full-length rod board shank provides stability, it's the ideal situation for dancers who crave lighty-shanked shoes.
Place the shanks in a casserole dish, drain off the oil from the pan and add enough red wine to cover the bottom of the pan, then boil to bring off any sediment from the shanks.
Shank cited the size and age of presses - probably the most expensive, complex and time-consuming part of a web-width reduction - as the two general issues to consider in deciding whether to change to 50"-wide newsprint rolls.
"If he was telling everyone that for every long position he was short somewhere else to arbitrage his risk, the bank should have seen that by looking at the back end of all his trades," Shank points out.
Shank pointed out that the task force has two major jobs.
As she has done many times before, Shank will make the case that her firm can help the state borrow the money it needs at a low cost.
3 December 2015 - UK-based waste-to-product business Shanks Group plc (LSE: SKS) has completed the disposal of its non-core Industrial Cleaning Wallonia business in Belgium for nominal consideration, the group said.
Charly Shanks and Andy Nett had never played doubles together in a national tournament.
With a degree in secondary education from the University of Kentucky, Bill Shanks discovered the only teaching jobs available in the early 1970s required him to relocate - something he didn't want to do.